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Discussion Starter #1
I am a Canadian 2013 Soul. I attempted to install a pair of LED light strip as my daytime running lights.

As you know, Canadian Soul has daytime running lights as standard. That is, when engine starts, without turning on any lights, the highbeam has a lower power and run as DRL.

I tapped the LED strip into the wires into the black and the wires for DRL. It works before I plug the harness/ connector back into the headlight module. But once I plug it in, I lose the LED and low power highbeam (DRL) turns on. I am suspecting it is because it doesn't have enough power for the LED light strip.

Alternately, I can tap into the parking lights but that defeats my purpose of having them as DRL.

Any Canadian/UK Soul owners able to solve this? Perhaps I should draw power directly from the battery or from a fuse?
 

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You may be correct. What you have done is put the LEDs in a parallel line with the low beam of the headlight. That means that if the circuit is not designed for both legs to operate, i.e., enough power, the lower resistance path will get more of the power (they share based on a ratio of overall presented impedance versus the resistance of each leg). Because the DRL is actually using the original headlight wiring for doing this, the wiring is not going to serve your purposes the way it is. To at least make this work, you would have to then begin to put resistors of some value into the line for the headlight so that the LED line shows the lower resistance. If you do this, then you may screw up the headlight operations altogether because it would now see a higher path resistance and instead of lighting the headlights it may continue to light the LEDs once the headlights were turned on.

It is best, IMHO, to return the wiring to the way it was. If you want the LEDs as DRLs then you can buy an aftermarket kit that may work, or you can wire the LEDs themselves to a dedicated line that only comes on when the ignition is on. Of course, these would not go out after the headlights were turned on. You can add a switch to the line in the dash area and you could then pick when you wanted them to come on and your original DRLs would still be there.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Adding resistors might not be a bad idea if I can make the following works:

1. If DRL becomes the LED strips. Regular DRL light bulb will not turn on
2. I can still able to turn on high-beam when "full power" is engage.

Do you think I can archive the above? If so where do you think I should add the resistor?
 

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Well, not sure how well equipped you are to do this so I will assume that you have everything. The best way to test to see if it is going to work is to use a small potentiometer probably in the 0 to 100 ohm range. It should be fairly heavy, so say about a 1 to 5 watts size. If that is too heavy, when you make it permanent you can drop to a 1/4 watt or lower, you just don't want to burn it up when you put on the high beams.

Connect it with alligator clips/wire or test leads first to test it out. It needs to be in line to the high beam light. Once installed temporarily, start with the pot at the lower end (1 ohm) and gradually move it up in small increments. At each stop test 1) do the LEDs come on instead of the existing DRL, 1) when the lights turned on, does the high beam work properly, and 3) check to make sure neither the pot nor the wiring is getting excessively hot. If you go to far, you will probably pop a fuse. Since light bulbs generally run between 2 to 8 ohms resistance, you will probably get up to say 15 to 25 ohms before it may work correctly.

Once you have established the correct values, you can find a permanent resistor and solder it into the circuit. Its size will be whatever value you stopped at with the potentiometer.

Signs that it will not work:
- The high beam does not operate or operates very dimly when the headlights are on,
- The wiring gets too hot,
- You blow a fuse.

A word of caution: This is not the best engineering method and you may destroy something in the process. Please keep that in mind before you start and are willing to take the risk that you may have to replace some wiring or headlights should anything go amiss. I am telling you this because I have been there and done that. This method is the really simplistic way of going, a better alternative, if you have the resources, is to put in a relay that is actuated by the light switch being turned to the on position and redirecting current away from the LEDs back to the high beam. That would take a lot more effort plus having to find the right relay to use. When the relay is off, power goes to the LEDs, when the relay is energized, power goes normally to the high beam.

Also, Phillips makes a four or eight LED DRL setup that you can install. You would still have the factory DRL working but in addition the other LED strips would be working also. There are several threads on this in addition to a You Tube video that shows how they work. Cost is about 70 USD for the four LED kit, about 20 higher for the eight. I would highly recommend that you consider that alternative carefully. You can talk to others here that have done it to their cars, and at some point I am going to install them on mine.

Not sure what you are talking about archiving. This thread will stay on the site for years to come so it is not going anywhere. Just go to your profile in the future and look for threads you have started, or search on the title and you can find it. Good luck and I hope this does not cause you warranty problems down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the detail instructions. Unfortunately, I have no knowledge of wiring or electronics. What you described, embarrassed to say, I don't understand one bit...

That said, I think it is better if I just leave it. Since I already have the LED strip, I might as will wire it to the parking light. I already have HID for the headlight as well as HID so the extra LED strip is extremely redundant.

Thanks for all your help on this.

P.S. Spelling error on my part. I meant "achieve" not "archive".
 

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Thanks for the detail instructions. Unfortunately, I have no knowledge of wiring or electronics. What you described, embarrassed to say, I don't understand one bit...That said, I think it is better if I just leave it. Since I already have the LED strip, I might as will wire it to the parking light. I already have HID for the headlight as well as HID so the extra LED strip is extremely redundant.
Good choice. If you do not understand I=E/R, you are best to leave it alone, IMHO. At least you have DRLs, we here in the US have to put them on aftermarket and the Phillips and other kits do just fine and look good. I would certainly hate to see any owner going into something like this and screw their brand new car up. If I influenced your thinking on the side of caution, then I am more than satisfied and you are certainly welcome.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ok, so I decided to wire the LED strip to the parking lights. Driver side works fine. When I test the passenger side, the fuse is blown and the wire to the LED strips gets really hot.

On the passenger side, I have also wired the LED hood emblem to the same harness. (One to the black wire and one to the parking light) Obviously, I don't know what I am doing. Just following what others have done. Am I overloading the circuit? How should I fix this?
 

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Ok, so I decided to wire the LED strip to the parking lights. Driver side works fine. When I test the passenger side, the fuse is blown and the wire to the LED strips gets really hot.

On the passenger side, I have also wired the LED hood emblem to the same harness. (One to the black wire and one to the parking light) Obviously, I don't know what I am doing. Just following what others have done. Am I overloading the circuit? How should I fix this?
If the wiring is getting too hot, that is a sure fire indication that the circuit is overloaded. This causes fires. The first thing is to back up and consider what is going on. The first lesson to take away is that fuses are not there to protect the load, they are there to protect the wiring from burning up. The second lesson is that electricity is just like water, it will take the path of least resistance to get to its destination.

What you are doing: Each line you have connected into an existing circuit is creating a parallel path. By creating an additional path, you effectively are cutting down on the resistance of the overall circuit. We are back to I=E/R (Amps = Volts/Resistance-Ohms). The fuse sees a decrease in resistance and since volts remains constant (12v), amps must increase. If a fuse is rated to survive or protect based on amps, pretty soon the rating is passed and POP goes the fuse. If the fuse did not pop, then P=E*I (Power in watts = Volts times Amps) dictates that as Amps begin to rise, the power in the circuit does too causing heat in the lines and ultimately fire.

The solution: If you are going to wire in new lights and keep (not replace) existing lights, this is going to occur for anyone that tries it. If it is a low power type circuit one may get away with it but if you begin to mix lower power components with higher power components, then the circuit can go haywire quickly. Light bulbs are high power components, LEDs are low power components. In other words the design using a filament type bulb is going to use the full 12V, but the LEDs are going to use a lower voltage to operated since they are essentially a solid state device (way to complicated to go into here) but for LEDs a portion of the 12v is picked off to operate them. So, wire the LEDs directly to the main bus (either before or after the ignition switch depending on what you want to do) and by pass all the other circuits if the LED device accepts 12v. Protect that circuit by installing it into the fuse block and adding at a minimum 15 Amp fuse and use the correct copper wire size (I would say between 16 to 10 gauge wire, but not anything smaller, i.e., 18 to 24 gauge). OR buy a predesigned control circuit for LED running lights.

Sorry to be a bummer on this for you, but the car is designed electrically for a certain load. Installation of anything is going to affect it so that installation should be engineered to work correctly or within tolerances of the overall design. Going back to the supplier may net some advice on how to properly install your particular lights, or you can see if Diode Dynamics will help you out with some advice on how to hook these LEDs up so that you don't have this problem. As for others that have done what you are trying to do, I don't know where they got their instructions or set up but if anyone violates the I=E/R tolerances of the circuit design, then pop goes the weasel.

Electricity 101 class is now dismissed.
 

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I am sure that this question has been asked (but can't seem to find it), but is there a way to "turn on" the DRL on a US model that the Canadian models use? I am guessing that the wiring harnesses of the cars are the same, so is there a relay that needs to be installed (or some program that needs to be updated)??

I know that I can turn on the running lights or headlights and just leave them on, but I really like the DRL system on my GM truck and my sister and brother's Toyotas, and would like my Soul to work the same way.

I have a 2014 Soul ! with WS.
 

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I am sure that this question has been asked (but can't seem to find it), but is there a way to "turn on" the DRL on a US model that the Canadian models use? I am guessing that the wiring harnesses of the cars are the same, so is there a relay that needs to be installed (or some program that needs to be updated)??

I know that I can turn on the running lights or headlights and just leave them on, but I really like the DRL system on my GM truck and my sister and brother's Toyotas, and would like my Soul to work the same way.

I have a 2014 Soul ! with WS.
Without knowing how the Canadian models are wired for DRL, this is a tough question to answer but I would not think that it would be prewired because there needs to be a control circuit added to the car to modify the light's behavior (i.e., dimming or off when the headlights are turned on). You are right that there has to be some sensing circuit to do this but I cannot see how the ECM would handle it without knowing some more specifics. A DRL kit (that uses LED lights, not existing head lights for the DRL) is available in a couple of forms and adds the sensing circuit for less than 100 bucks. It installs easily. Go to YouTube and search for Phillips DRL Soul kit, it shows just how easy it is to install and then decide which avenue you wish to pursue. There are several folks here that have done that and threads that talk about doing it with the kits.

But logically, the Canadian models use existing lamps I believe (low power to the high or low beams) so the wiring would already be there for this but the control circuit would be missing. Good Luck and let us know what you find out.
 

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If the wiring is getting too hot, that is a sure fire indication that the circuit is overloaded. This causes fires. The first thing is to back up and consider what is going on. The first lesson to take away is that fuses are not there to protect the load, they are there to protect the wiring from burning up. The second lesson is that electricity is just like water, it will take the path of least resistance to get to its destination.

What you are doing: Each line you have connected into an existing circuit is creating a parallel path. By creating an additional path, you effectively are cutting down on the resistance of the overall circuit. We are back to I=E/R (Amps = Volts/Resistance-Ohms). The fuse sees a decrease in resistance and since volts remains constant (12v), amps must increase. If a fuse is rated to survive or protect based on amps, pretty soon the rating is passed and POP goes the fuse. If the fuse did not pop, then P=E*I (Power in watts = Volts times Amps) dictates that as Amps begin to rise, the power in the circuit does too causing heat in the lines and ultimately fire.

The solution: If you are going to wire in new lights and keep (not replace) existing lights, this is going to occur for anyone that tries it. If it is a low power type circuit one may get away with it but if you begin to mix lower power components with higher power components, then the circuit can go haywire quickly. Light bulbs are high power components, LEDs are low power components. In other words the design using a filament type bulb is going to use the full 12V, but the LEDs are going to use a lower voltage to operated since they are essentially a solid state device (way to complicated to go into here) but for LEDs a portion of the 12v is picked off to operate them. So, wire the LEDs directly to the main bus (either before or after the ignition switch depending on what you want to do) and by pass all the other circuits if the LED device accepts 12v. Protect that circuit by installing it into the fuse block and adding at a minimum 15 Amp fuse and use the correct copper wire size (I would say between 16 to 10 gauge wire, but not anything smaller, i.e., 18 to 24 gauge). OR buy a predesigned control circuit for LED running lights.

Sorry to be a bummer on this for you, but the car is designed electrically for a certain load. Installation of anything is going to affect it so that installation should be engineered to work correctly or within tolerances of the overall design. Going back to the supplier may net some advice on how to properly install your particular lights, or you can see if Diode Dynamics will help you out with some advice on how to hook these LEDs up so that you don't have this problem. As for others that have done what you are trying to do, I don't know where they got their instructions or set up but if anyone violates the I=E/R tolerances of the circuit design, then pop goes the weasel.

Electricity 101 class is now dismissed.
Check out the big brain on Shaggy!!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The harness that plugs in to the headlight unit is different. The US ones, based on the pictures I see from the forum, has 6 wires and the Canadian ones has a few more. That said, the headlight unit must also be different.

Because of this project, I recently came across a auto DRL on/off switch that you tap directly to the battery. However, it is meant low consumption lights such as LED strips. I just ordered one from eBay for about $20.
 

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The harness that plugs in to the headlight unit is different. The US ones, based on the pictures I see from the forum, has 6 wires and the Canadian ones has a few more. That said, the headlight unit must also be different.

Because of this project, I recently came across a auto DRL on/off switch that you tap directly to the battery. However, it is meant low consumption lights such as LED strips. I just ordered one from eBay for about $20.
Sounds like a decent alternative. Let us know how that works out and what you did with it.
 
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