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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quick question to the current owners;

I assumed the soul ran on standard 89 fuel. The other day I was lookin in the manual, and I swear is reccommended running 91 on ONE page, and 89 on the other!

I have run both, and I don't hear any 'knocking' at 89. But if the engine really his a high-compression engine, then I want to run the proper fuel. Of course if it's not, I see no reason to throw money away on higher grade fuel if the engine is dosen't need it.

Anyone else still trying to figure out the right fuel to run?
 

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The BetaII engine runs just fine on the recommended lower-octane fuels (87/89 depending on your area). There is no need to put high octane fuel in the car, unless you have serious performance modifications requiring it (like forced induction).
 

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It's recommended for 87 octane which is what I put in it. Turbo engines need higher octane and the Soul does not have a turbo engine.

As long as you do not get knocking, you should put the lowest octane fuel you can find unless the book says to put in something else. In this case, the book says that 87 is the lowest you should put in.

If you hear knocking with 87 octane fuel, try putting in 89. This could mean the last fillup had some crappy fuel in it or it could mean a more serious problem with your engine.

During winter time, it's actually better to put in low octane fuel than high octane. 87 octane burns faster than 92 or 94. Thus during cold winter mornings, your car will start easier.

The higher the octane, the more evenly it burns, and the slower it burns. Low octane fuel burns faster, but it burns randomly at times thus that's why you get knocking. Sometimes the fuel is still burning during the exhaust cycle which will make you car knock.

Basically unless your car specifically takes high octane fuel, you will NOT gain more horsepower and you will NOT gain gas mileage with high octane fuel.

So there is absolutely no reason to put high octane fuel in a Kia Soul unless you hear knocking. And if you hear knocking with 87 octane, either you have some bad fuel, or you have some problems with your engine and you need to have it checked out.
 

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I will investigate this for the people in Holland.
Thank you Casoul for mention this.
 

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87, and everything is fine and dandy.
 

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I want to whole heartedly "second" everything Bodycount says. I used to be duped into putting higher octane gas into my cars thinking it was something like "purer water" or "higher quality" fuel. That's nonsense and absolutely untrue.

On this topic - and I know some of you are going to disagree - but there is practically NO difference between gasoline brands, including the generics. I had a grad school professor who did the majority of his professional life in the petroleum tanker business, and he had a hardy laugh at anyone who was convinced that "Brand X" gasoline was better than "Brand Y." The dirty little secret in the industry is that gasoline is a volume commodity, just like natural gas and liquid propane. You don't demand "Exxon brand propane" when you fill up your grill do you? Same with gasoline. The vast majority of gasoline is refined off-shore and brought here by tanker, where local refineries make the necessary changes to meet state law requirements (each state apparently has different requirements for what can be in gasoline).

It took me a while after hearing that to break the "big name" pump habit and start filling up at "Oceana" (the generic gasoline station in my neighborhood).

But as I always say, and in this case quite literally, "YMMV" ! :)
 

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well some companies put in additives to clean your engine ...

well.. they say they are doing it but you never really know.

I know BP adds an anti-water agent in their gas during the winter months. Supposed to make it so you never have to use dry gas additive
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Cool. Everyone just confirmed what I was thinking. Low grade it is. I'll have to look in the manual again, because I swear I saw a 91 Rating page in the specs area somewhere, and that's what had me confused!

Thanks group!
 

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manual calls for 87-91... started with 91 and then went to 89 and not sure why but got better mpg with 87 on last fill but am testing with 89 again to see if there is something to lower octane or if it is engine breaking in...
 

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I was told by a tanker truck driver that when they "tank up" at the refinery, they put a small amount of whatever additive the "brand" of gasoline calls for and let the gas mix the additive in natually while driving to the delivery point. All gas comes from the same refinery, it is the small 1 pint of additives they put in the gas that makes it "special".

Me, I get my gas at Costco.... 87 all the way.
 

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A few things to clear up for everyone. Most of what has already been said is true. Gas is gas. It's the additives that make the "brand". The process is kind of like an automatic coffey dispenser. The driver enters a booth, plugs in the "formula" that that he needs and the equipment dumps in the appropriate fluids to give him the formulation he requested. Think of the formulas like ordering either a Coke, a Cherry Coke, a Diet Coke, Sprite, etc. Here's where it gets fun for everyone.

Those formulations can vary by state. For example, in the state of Missouri, gas stations are allowed to use up to 10% ethenol WITHOUT having to post that information. To make this even more fun, there are INCENTIVES provided by the state that end up making the formulations with ethenol cheaper. Now to get the "most didn't know" trifecta we won't disclose the fact that with the ethenol added to the 87 octane formulation we have effectivally ended up with an actual octane of 89. So that mid grade gas you see that's just a tad more expensive, is the same stuff you get out of the selection just to the left that is marked 87 octane and cheaper.

...at least in the state of Missouri. :)
 

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87 here. Just make sure you buy from a station that has a high turnover of fuel and add a bottle of STP fuel additive about every 5 tanks or so to get the water out and keep the injectors clean.
 

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87 for quite awhile, but did notice some knocking while under load....climbing Texas street here in San Diego out of Mission Valley. The knocking was VERY slight, but a change to the mid grade (I guess 89) seemed to make the knock go away.

During my recent 1,000 mile trip up to Bridgeport/Bodie......ran nothing but Chevron's "Supreme" which I guess is 91 now. Dunno why really. Just wanted to give her a long run with the good stuff :)

I musta missed the memo when the numbers 88,90 and 92...went down to 87,89,91

The gas pumps musta got hit with the Supermarket Shrink Ray. The same thing that makes a PINT of ice cream.....NOT a pint anymore.
 
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