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Discussion Starter #1
As part of my continuing quest to learn....

Totally ignoring tyre diameter, profile etc etc.

If my wheels have a rim width of 7 inches........what is the optimum (not minimum or maximum) but optimum width of tyre that could be used on these rims......the rims equate to 175mm.....would the optimum tyre therefore be 175mm???.

Also as a sub thread to this. Has anybody considered lightening the standard heavy Kia alloy wheels????....and if so how would this be approached??:confused:
 

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As part of my continuing quest to learn....

Totally ignoring tyre diameter, profile etc etc.

If my wheels have a rim width of 7 inches........what is the optimum (not minimum or maximum) but optimum width of tyre that could be used on these rims......the rims equate to 175mm.....would the optimum tyre therefore be 175mm???.

Also as a sub thread to this. Has anybody considered lightening the standard heavy Kia alloy wheels????....and if so how would this be approached??:confused:
Gary, please don't take this in the wrong way but how could you POSSIBLY lighten an alloy wheel? Remove material right? Think of the balance and safety issues there! I enjoy this forum but I'm constantly amazed at the number of people who evidently consider themselves 'automotive engineers'. I've built hot rods from the last nut and bolt up and had to 'engineer' them but wouldn't dream of doing it with a new car. The width question, generally, tyre width should be close to wheel width, you can cheat either way somewhat. Sorry, sometimes I have to vent a little.
 

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Gary, please don't take this in the wrong way but how could you POSSIBLY lighten an alloy wheel? Remove material right? Think of the balance and safety issues there! I enjoy this forum but I'm constantly amazed at the number of people who evidently consider themselves 'automotive engineers'. I've built hot rods from the last nut and bolt up and had to 'engineer' them but wouldn't dream of doing it with a new car. The width question, generally, tyre width should be close to wheel width, you can cheat either way somewhat. Sorry, sometimes I have to vent a little.
vent to your hearts content.....im quite happy to listen and learn. As far as the wheels go - it is generally acknowledged that the stock wheels are over engineered and very heavy. I have absolutely no intention of touching them myself. However if somebody could recommend a company that specialises in lightening and balancing and do it safely - i would consider it. I am all for making the best of what i have, rather than replace things unnecessarily......unless replacement is the better option.
 

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Over engineered sounds like a good thing to me. I would think they are still lighter than the steel wheel. Less unsprung weight improves riide and handlng but enough to notice? I doubt it. For the price of having your wheels lightened (and I doubt any competent shop would touch it for liability reasons) you could probably buy a set of lighter wheels. Cost of wheels, mounting and balancing, is it worth it? Only you can answer that.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
you could probably buy a set of lighter wheels. Cost of wheels, mounting and balancing, is it worth it? Only you can answer that.[/QUOTE]

I agree.......having first listened to other peoples valid reasons, experiences and opinions ....thanks.
 

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if you are looking for a lighter wheel see if you can find a decent set of kosei k-1's, they only weigh like 15 lbs each. rota slipstreams are about the same weight also. the kosei k1 is no longer on sale, thats why you have to find a nice used set. the rota slipstreams are still available, so if you dont want a used set, you can buy new. in regards to tire width, if you are staying with the stock rims, i wouldnt go up in tire width at all unless you are going for a stiffer and much higher quality tire that wont roll the sidewall as much. if you do that then you can go up 10-20mm usually with no major issues. if you are going with a comparable quality tire to OEM then going up in width with the same rim width is going to create a pretty big safety risk in the corners and braking department...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
if you are looking for a lighter wheel see if you can find a decent set of kosei k-1's, they only weigh like 15 lbs each. rota slipstreams are about the same weight also. the kosei k1 is no longer on sale, thats why you have to find a nice used set. the rota slipstreams are still available, so if you dont want a used set, you can buy new. in regards to tire width, if you are staying with the stock rims, i wouldnt go up in tire width at all unless you are going for a stiffer and much higher quality tire that wont roll the sidewall as much. if you do that then you can go up 10-20mm usually with no major issues. if you are going with a comparable quality tire to OEM then going up in width with the same rim width is going to create a pretty big safety risk in the corners and braking department...
thanks for that. I am actually considering going down in tyre width in the long term. And if i do keep the existing rims - i would rather fit the most suitable width of tyre for that rim - not the widest one i can squeeze on.
 

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The tire question is a bit tough to answer.

The reason is that tires are only made in specifice sizes. This is because the Section Width (in mm) and Aspect Ratio (in percent) are predetermined by the automotive industrie's needs and the tire manufactures's desire to meet these needs. Not all tire sizes are made by all tire manufactures.

Tire size examples:
205/55-16 (Section Width = 205mm / Aspect Ratio = 55% of 205mm)
225/45-18 (Section Width = 225mm / Aspect Ratio = 45% of 225mm)

Now because the Aspect Ratio (sidewall height) is a percent of the tire's Section Width the diameter of the tire is a function of the Wheel Size, tire Section Width and vehicle requirements.

You don't want a tire that is too thin for the wheel because it will pull on the bead when cornering at speed. Also you don't want a tire that is too wide because you could roll the sidewall when cornering at speed.

It's a tough question to answer well. I think maybe the best thing for you to do is just keep researching like you are and check out diverent tire sizes at a good tire website and see what you come up with. Often these better tire websites have tire tech pages.

Sorry I wish I had a real answer but I don't really think there is just one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for that Soberone. What i am trying to decide in time for the next tyre change, is the perfect tyre make and size and possibly wheel for my own personal needs in what i want from the car and how i want it to ride and handle.....despite the problems i am having with the car - i fully intend keeping it for many years amd improving it along the way. So i am breaking the tyre issue down into smaller questions.......which when the time comes i will try and hit all my requirements with the relevant answers. Thanks for your advice. Hopefully when the time comes...the tyre choice will be much wider too.
 

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Unfortunately the more you learn about tires, tire technology, and proper tire sizing you will automatically start to reduce the number the tires you deam acceptable. Sort of like the old saying "knowing too much for your own good", but I'm not actually sure if knowledge is ever a bad thing.

If I recall correctly...
Treadlife, ride comfort, performance were your preferences in order of importance for your tire selection.
So... imho, If you want wide, a fair selection of tires to shoose from, some bling, and light weight I think a light 17x7.5 wheel with either 215/50-17 tires or a 225/45-17 tires should be what to look at.

There are plenty of really good light weight wheels in the 17" size. The 215/50-17 and 225/45-17 tires is wider than the stock 205/55-16 tire and will looses cushion from the sidewall height but should still be ok. If you don't mind the ride of the 225/45-18 tires and 18" wheels then the 215/50-17 and 225/45-17 tires and 17" wheels will be better although the 215/50-17 will be a bit thiner.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thnaks again soberone, you do recall my requirements correctly. Still got plenty of time yet before new tyres.
 
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