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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone had to use it yet? I think Kia struck out and costing the customer more with this kit. Kia says that it is possible that the sealant will damage the TPMS, in other words it needs to be replaced. I got lucky, the Souls wheel bolt pattern and offset is exactly the same as my Mustang GT's wheel, I am going to sell the Mustang but keep the donut spare. I am going to swap out my stangs wheel and tires and see how it looks, my stang is black so the gray wheels will match. They are "17 and my Soul wears "16, at least it is something to do and a bit of exciting and wondering what it looks like, yeah it doesn't take me much to get excited these days.
 

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I just got my real spare tire kit yesterday. I've always felt a little uncomfortable with having just the fix-a-flat option, even though I haven't had a flat tire in about 25 years.

I know I can always call Roadside Assistance, but honestly, if that turned into a 2-3 hour ordeal, I'd be wondering why I didn't just get a real spare and be on my way in 15 minutes.

IMG_1182.jpg IMG_1183.jpg
 

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Yeah, I got spare tire kits for both Souls, though I also have not had a flat in a very long time (on the road). I personally think that fooling around with sealant and the tire inflator on the side of the road would suck. I suppose it is possible that it would be faster, but I know that I can jack a car, change a tire and be on my way in less than 15 minutes. If I screw up the sealant, or it doesn't work, I'm waiting on a friend (sorry ****) or a tow truck.

That said, the sealant kits are pretty common on a lot of cars these days.
 

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Yeah, I got spare tire kits for both Souls, though I also have not had a flat in a very long time (on the road). I personally think that fooling around with sealant and the tire inflator on the side of the road would suck. I suppose it is possible that it would be faster, but I know that I can jack a car, change a tire and be on my way in less than 15 minutes. If I screw up the sealant, or it doesn't work, I'm waiting on a friend (sorry ****) or a tow truck.

That said, the sealant kits are pretty common on a lot of cars these days.
Hey jd, I don't think the sealant method would be faster. I watched the Kia how-to video & it looks like a pain, and may not even work. Once you hook up the pump and fill the tire & add the sealant, you have to drive for a bit to "shake it all about." Then pull over again and add more air. And like Tape said, probably all while funking up the TPMS.

I think it would be better for Kia to just put a rabbits foot back there & a note to call RA.
 

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I've never been a fan of tire sealants or "mobility kits." I ordered the donut kit from a fellow on eBay a few months ago. The mobility kit is sitting in my basement now. I figure if I ever trade the car in for another Soul that uses the same spare, I'll replace the mobility kit and keep the donut.
 

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I've never been a fan of tire sealants or "mobility kits." I ordered the donut kit from a fellow on eBay a few months ago. The mobility kit is sitting in my basement now. I figure if I ever trade the car in for another Soul that uses the same spare, I'll replace the mobility kit and keep the donut.
I actually just took the compressor and goo out of the foam holder and stuck it in the organizer, so now I have both. I figure there's nothing wrong with having your own little air compressor if you need air in the tire, especially since it already came with the car. Not that I would probably use it, since I have 2 good air compressors already at the house (a big 50 gallon one and a pancake), but it's just one of those things...
 

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^^^^ Well if you two did it, them I'm gonna too!

Thanks for the great idea :)
 
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Thats what I did as well, just seemed like a waste not to have in there even if its never used. may help someone else out who gets a flat
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Since the Soul's bolt pattern is the same as the mustang's I am using my donut from my mustang and it's jack and crowbar, the mustang is getting sold.
 

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That mobility kit is pointless for anything bigger than a small nail hole. The last tire mishap i had happened when I hit what was either a railroad spike or chunk of rebar at a railroad crossing, the hole was big enough to put my finger in.
 

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That mobility kit is pointless for anything bigger than a small nail hole. The last tire mishap i had happened when I hit what was either a railroad spike or chunk of rebar at a railroad crossing, the hole was big enough to put my finger in.
And even if it does patch the hole, it may do so at the cost of the tire.

I've never used the Kia goo, but some goos tenaciously stick to the inside of the tire and can't be removed without solvents, which can't be used because they would eat away at the tire itself. They may also puddle up and throw off the balance, and they always coat the inside of the wheel.

Cleaning the wheel usually isn't a problem because solvent can be used. Cleaning the tire may be time-consuming (read "expensive") or impossible, and may result in needing a new tire. It depends on the goo. They all have to have enough solvency and stickiness to seal the puncture. The question becomes how difficult they are to remove. (They also have a tendency to clog up the TPMS sensors, but those usually can be cleaned.)

If the goo can't be easily and completely removed from the tire, it's doubtful you'll find a mechanic willing to repair the tire the proper way. In fact, there's no guarantee you'll find a mechanic who's even willing to try. If you have a guy (or gal) that you use all the time, they may do it just for the sake of keeping a good customer. Otherwise, you may be out of luck.

One of my best friends is a top-notch mechanic (and also a fellow pilot whose airplane I've worked on from time to time), and he refuses to touch tires that have been gooed unless the customer cleans them out. He'll unmount the tire, hand it to the customer, and tell them to come back when all the goo is gone.
 

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I have a third generation Tire man that I've trusted with my tires for the past 28 years.
I talked to him about the Kia "Goo" and he just laughed. He said that if I or anyone brings him a Goo'ed up tire, they just bought a new tire and a new TPMS sensor. They don't clean up Goo!

"Fix A Flat" (tire repair Goo) has been on the store shelves for YEARS now, and I've never owned a can, and never will.
The alternative has been around almost as long as the Automobile...... it's called a spare tire.

The body of the Kia Soul, was stamped out to include a spare tire well, big enough for a full sized tire and rim and some extra space for jumper cables, tow strap and even a little air compressor, if you like (and I do).

I've posted the picture of my own spare tire and roadside emergency Kit. In respect for the old timers, i won't post it again. Eh?

If you have a blowout on a highway, miles from home and you don't have a spare and the knowledge and equipment to put it on, you can usually kiss that day goodby.
Wherever you were going....forgetaboutit! By the time you call Roadside assistance, and wait an hour or two for them to arrive, and then take you to a service point and you finally get another tire mounted and on your car, your day will be shot. Then explain to the kids that their day at the ?????? was ruined, because daddy was to cheap to buy a spare tire.

:cool:
PS: Have you ever seen a Guy and his wife and two kids and a dog in the front seat of a tow truck? rofl
 
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A point to ponder!

Should you decide to use the little air compressor that came with the car, , , , I tested mine and found that the little compressor can take quite a while to re-inflate a 15" standard tire. A 17 or 18" tire might take longer. I also found that the screw-on fitting on the air hose is a real pain to get on and off the tire, without loosing air. I really HATE fussing with things like that, so.....

I constructed an adapter so I can use a standard Air Chuck.

Once the adapter is secured to the air hose, I can air up a tire just like I would at home.

Most compressors purchased at an auto parts store or Walmart, do not have the screw-on fitting, and are easier to use.

Also, the Kia air compressor barely puts out enough pressure to fully inflate a tire, if you don't want to fully inflate it. It won't do the 42psi that I carry as standard in all my tires. I tried.
It crapped out at about 36psi.

Good Luck, Y'all!

:cool:
 

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A point to ponder!

Should you decide to use the little air compressor that came with the car, , , , I tested mine and found that the little compressor can take quite a while to re-inflate a 15" standard tire. A 17 or 18" tire might take longer. I also found that the screw-on fitting on the air hose is a real pain to get on and off the tire, without loosing air. I really HATE fussing with things like that, so.....

I constructed an adapter so I can use a standard Air Chuck.

Once the adapter is secured to the air hose, I can air up a tire just like I would at home.

Most compressors purchased at an auto parts store or Walmart, do not have the screw-on fitting, and are easier to use.

Also, the Kia air compressor barely puts out enough pressure to fully inflate a tire, if you don't want to fully inflate it. It won't do the 42psi that I carry as standard in all my tires. I tried.
It crapped out at about 36psi.

Good Luck, Y'all!

:cool:
Another advantage to carrying a compressor around (along with a tire repair kit) is that sometimes it provides the option of doing a permanent repair right there on the side of the road.

This usually is an option only when the cause of the puncture is obvious and still present, such as a nail, so you know where the hole is. (I suppose you could also carry around a spritzer of soapy water if you wanted to, but that might be a bit much and wouldn't work well in the winter.) It takes about six minutes to learn how to use a standard tire repair kit, after which you'll be able to permanently repair most punctures with the best of them.
 
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