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I do something similar to FL with my 2011 Plus. I have my key ring with all of my keys including House key, Paddock key, Gate, etc., Plus an extra key for the Soul. This key ring never leaves my pocket unless I’m locking the House for instance, then I have my original Switchblade key Fob by itself for starting the Kia. I have had this extra key set-up for all of my vehicles for 20 years now otherwise I would have been locked out 20 plus times or more by now. I haven’t looked at the Gen-3s but I assume they still have a good old-fashioned key slot in the driver door.
First thing I did when I got my "11 Soul + was get a regular key made and tossed the switchblade key fob in the file cabinet...had a Viper alarm system installed and use that key fob instead with a lockout key hidden under the bumper in a magnetic key box.
 

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Solved the problem with locking the door with the big switch key fob in the car. 2020 Soul S. Been there did that, but not no more. Got a key only blank & got it cut and have it stashed out side the car in a place that is safe & out of the weather & easy to get at & no problem using it to remove that little cover next to the door handle. Now for the Paul Harvey Rest of the Story........Can't tell you where the stash place is & it's so neat, I'll get my car stolen & I love shooting Thieves, but Ammo is to expensive right now, plus the clean up..............
Good thing not too many car thieves take Kia Souls. LOL
 

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2016 Kia Soul + Clear White 2.0 L GDI
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I used to lock the key fob in our push to start Honda van when I'd go out paddleboarding or kayaking, figuring that a simple key would take a saltwater immersion better than a fob. I was able to use to door panel lock switch to activate the locks, then close the door. Even with the proximity fob inside the van, the locks would not unlock to the touch.

Some hooligans tried to use a screwdriver to open the drivers side lock and ruined the mechanism (but did not unlock the van). Thankfully this happened when the fob was in my pocket, so I was able to get in the van. After replacing the mechanical lock I found a waterproof box to hold the fob when out on the water.
 

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2019 Kia Soul +, 2.0L
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129 Posts
I guess the back seat rest is not removable? I wasn’t aware they were doing this with regular Sedans with trunk lids. Unfortunately, the auto makers are trying to save a buck by eliminating all key locks except for the driver door (so far). The lift gate on my 2011 is electric only. The only safeguard is removing the rear trim panel to access a mechanical mechanism. I keep a lot of stuff back there so this would be very annoying if the electrical unit cuts out. As a retired Auto Damage Appraiser, I was inspecting a rolled over Ford Explorer at a tow yard when the owners showed up to get their stuff, the gate was electric with no key hole and the battery was dead, they had a lot of stuff in the rear cargo area, luckily, I was able to hook up my Portable Jump box I had so the lift gate would open.
I folded down the rear seat and I retrieved everything within reach. The craziest thing is that I'm moving to Florida next week, so I'm gonna be leaving my car in Maryland.

If the Chrysler warrantee doesn't pay the NADA value of the car... then I guess the dealership will need to sell it to the nearest junk yard.
 

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2019 Kia Soul +, 2.0L
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Engine parts obstructed my ability to remove all of my personal belongings when I folded down the rear seat. I removed some stuff, but I couldn't reach everything. The cylinder head, exhaust manifold, part of the exhaust pipe, intake manifold, and other parts prevented me from reaching everything.

For full disclosure, I have the "Max Care" warrantee from Chrysler on this vehicle (Chrysler no longer offers this warrantee). It is an unlimited mileage, unlimited time warrantee with a $50 deductible for covered repairs, which include everything except tires, brake pads, brake rotors, serpentine belt, and... hmmm... those are the only exclusions.

The only limitation to this warrantee is that if a single repair costs more than the NADA retail value of the car, then Chrysler will write me a check for the NADA retail value of the car.

For those who don't know, the NADA retail value of a car is the highest valuation of a vehicle. It's the amount of money that a dealership wants you to PAY for a used car!!!

So... yeah... my 2011 Chrysler 200 requires a complete engine replacement. And, this is why Chrysler is "dicking" me around.

EDIT: I suppose I should be thankful. I paid $4400 for the warrantee, and the warrantee paid more than $4400 in repairs. However... I shouldn't have needed more than $4400 in repairs during the life of my 2011 Chrysler 200. It only has 165k miles. The warrantee paid for all new struts (all four), a new cylinder head, multiple replacements of cooling system components, a new alternator, and lots of other stuff. The warrantee always paid for a free "loaner" vehicle. But... NONE of this should have happened during 165K miles!!!

Prior to the 2011 Chrysler, the worst-performing car I ever owned was a 2005 Saturn VUE. I spent approximately $4000 on repairs during the life of the Saturn VUE, and I decided to get rid of it when it had 260K miles, because the manual transmission was worn out, and it was leaking oil like a sieve.

The best car I ever owned was a 1998 Dodge Stratus. I literally never spent a penny on repairs. I never even replaced a light bulb. I put 290k miles on that car. That was when the automatic transmission started to slip, and I sold it to a friend for $700. It was his son's first car.

I have been a life-long buyer of American cars... and I always sought-out vehicles with at least 75% American parts. built by UNION workers... because my father was a strong supporter of American worker unions (he was a Teamster). The Dodge/Chrysler vehicles I have owned in the past had more than 80% American parts.

But... after a total failure of my 2011 Chrysler after only 165K miles (and I've had serious problems with a couple of Ford and GM vehicles prior to 100K miles)... I decided to buy a "foreign" car. I had a great experience with my 1988 Hyundai Excel. I put nearly 300K miles on it until I fell asleep at the wheel and totaled the car.

So... with great regret, I have given-up on American cars.
 
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