Kia Soul Forums :: Kia Soul Owners banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,631 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently stripped the head of my snowblower's engine removing a spark plug that had been in there for three years. No big deal. I popped in a helicoil and all was well.

It did, however, get me thinking about my Soul's spark plugs. At 100,000 miles, I imagine those things could be seized in there pretty tightly. That could certainly ruin a weekend. So I'm leaning toward adding an annual maintenance task of removing and replacing the spark plugs (same plugs, not new ones), probably applying some high-temperature nickel anti-seize compound for good measure.

Other than having to reduce the torque a bit, I've never had any problems with the nickel compound. I have had some odd PCM errors when using certain other kinds of anti-seize compounds on cars with electronic ignition (usually random misfire codes with no actual misfires), but the nickel compound seems to avoid that.

Any opinions on this?
 

·
Super Moderator
2010 Exclaim
Joined
·
8,100 Posts
I use the Permatex® brand on my plugs which is a blend of aluminum, copper and graphite. I've replaced mine twice using anti-seize both times.....something I was made aware of years ago when working on diesel engines. The nickle compound could be better BUT anti-seize compound of some type is very necessary when screwing anything into aluminum.
 
  • Like
Reactions: GeekOnTheHill

·
Registered
Joined
·
751 Posts
I recently changed my plugs (for the first time) at 100K miles. They were tight, but nothing to make me stress out over stripping any threads. I used a lead based anti-seize when replacing them. I have used it many times on other car and motorcycle plugs, with no issues. As long as you don't smear the anti-seize up under the washer, you won't affect the grounding at that point. Should never cause any misfires.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,631 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I recently changed my plugs (for the first time) at 100K miles. They were tight, but nothing to make me stress out over stripping any threads. I used a lead based anti-seize when replacing them. I have used it many times on other car and motorcycle plugs, with no issues. As long as you don't smear the anti-seize up under the washer, you won't affect the grounding at that point. Should never cause any misfires.....
It never caused any misfires. But on my old Saturn S-Series cars, it sometimes caused false misfire codes. But the Saturn engines had a peculiar "waste spark" pattern that also caused things like camshaft position sensor errors when the wires were loose or old or the coil packs were corroded. (They didn't actually have camshaft position sensors.)

Also, in my experience, the S-Series engines ran like crap on platinum plugs and sometimes actually misfired on them. They wanted copper. (I don't think Iridium plugs were available yet.) So maybe it was something peculiar to the S-Series engines that anything the ignition system wasn't expecting would cause the PCM to vomit; and because I owned so many of them, I generalized it to the anti-seize compound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
I've never had any issue using the little anti-seize packets in AutoZone for my spark plugs in any car. Don't reduce the torque. And it's not necessary to exercise the threads every year- that's just more opportunity to damage the threads with extra remove/insert cycles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
751 Posts
It never caused any misfires. But on my old Saturn S-Series cars, it sometimes caused false misfire codes. But the Saturn engines had a peculiar "waste spark" pattern that also caused things like camshaft position sensor errors when the wires were loose or old or the coil packs were corroded. (They didn't actually have camshaft position sensors.)

Also, in my experience, the S-Series engines ran like crap on platinum plugs and sometimes actually misfired on them. They wanted copper. (I don't think Iridium plugs were available yet.) So maybe it was something peculiar to the S-Series engines that anything the ignition system wasn't expecting would cause the PCM to vomit; and because I owned so many of them, I generalized it to the anti-seize compound.
Funny you mention the cars not liking the platinum plugs. I once had a 2004 Rio that used the waste spark ignition and it also liked copper plugs. Anything high tech like platinum or iridiums made it misfire (or at least throw misfire codes). It was also really finicky about gaps. It preferred smaller .025 -.030 gaps (and it had brand new coils!). Makes me start reminiscing about all the weird quirks in all the cars I used to own......
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,631 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Funny you mention the cars not liking the platinum plugs. I once had a 2004 Rio that used the waste spark ignition and it also liked copper plugs. Anything high tech like platinum or iridiums made it misfire (or at least throw misfire codes). It was also really finicky about gaps. It preferred smaller .025 -.030 gaps (and it had brand new coils!). Makes me start reminiscing about all the weird quirks in all the cars I used to own......
The Saturns were full of quirks. Great cars, though. I owned six of them.

As for the platinum plugs, I never could figure out why they didn't work right. Even the double platinums, which supposedly were made for waste spark systems, caused misfire codes without any evidence of actual misfires. They also caused the engine to lose about 10 percent of its fuel economy. I gave up early on and just used copper. They were cheaper anyway, and they were very easy to change on the S-Series engines.

I don't think I ever tried iridium in the Saturns. I'm not sure they were even out yet. Iridium is a better conductor than platinum, so maybe they would have worked. If I ever pick up another old Saturn as a project car, maybe I'll give them a try.

The Soul doesn't have too many quirks that I've noticed other than the grounds and a particular sensitivity to borderline stale gas. It throws a knock sensor code without any noticeable knocking. The mechanic at the dealership told me to put a can of Techron in to prevent any varnishing and just burn through the tank of gas when that happens. It seems to work. The code usually goes away by itself shortly after filling up with fresher gas. If not, I clear it with the scanner. It doesn't come back.

Certain times of the year (like now) I tend to avoid the three closest stations to me because the turnover is low and the gas is marginal before you even pump it. I buy gas at one of the busier stations in the surrounding towns during the really slow seasons unless I saw the gas truck at a local station a day or two before. Once the fishing season starts, the local gas starts moving again.

STA-BIL also helps. It doesn't freshen the gas, but it prevents it from getting any more stale than it already is. I've had gas treated with STA-BIL in storage for as long as two years without it going bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
It is unavoidable that individual spark plugs do not jump when automotive engines are working. It is very important to strengthen regular maintenance and repair of spark plugs so as to avoid the occurrence of spark plugs, so as to ensure normal work.

If the engine idles and the spark plug is short-circuited successively with the screwdriver, the spark plug without spark jumping can be found, or the spark plug can be removed and placed on the cylinder head. The contact of the spark plug core wiring can be tested by the end, and the phenomenon of strong spark jumping can be judged.

Spark plugs should be maintained and repaired regularly in use. If abnormalities are found, they should be repaired in time. If necessary, new parts should be repaired, adjusted or replaced according to specifications.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
291 Posts
Anti-seize is not recommended by most Manufacturer's these days. Not sure who makes Kia braded plugs, But the big boys like NGK say not to use it.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top