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2010, Kia Soul +, 5-spd
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Discussion Starter #1
In a different post, I shared about what had been done to resolve the p0455 issues. Well, the car finally ended up at the dealer, instead of continuing to mess around with the Belle Tire. Within 10 minutes my local Kia dealer found the problem.

Fuel Pressure sensor. They said at idle the sensor should read the pressure as 2.4. on my car it was reading,
-46psi. Yes, that is a negative number. So, after the non-Kia shop had me replace the Fuel filler neck, fuel cap, vent valve, and the purge solenoid, we now no it's just that sensor. Sadly, Belle Tire did the oil change on it 6/9/2020, and stripped out my oil pan, and Kia says that they can't even try to tap new threads with what BT did. Pan has to be replaced.

So to summarize, IF you have the P0455 code on your 2.0L kia, check your gas cap, and if that isn't it, have them check the reading on the fuel pressure sensor. If it's out of spec, that will be the actual problem. Of course, have them do the smoke test to smoke the system too, but more than likely, it's going to be your fuel cap, or your fuel pressure sensor.


This message is brought to you by my wallet and bank account that are still crying in the corner and not talking to me.
 

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Might be something I need to look into, I've already changed the evap solenoid, gas cap, and the sensor at the rear of the car. The name of that one escapes me right now. After each install I reset the codes and they come back over time.
 

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It sounds like the real lesson here is to not use Belle Tire. Sorry about your bad experience.
 

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Many years ago I took my new at the time 1992 GMC Sonoma in for an oil change and they somehow cross threaded the drain plug and must have used vice grips to tighten it because the hex on the bolt was gone. It didn't leak so I didn't notice it until the next change, I've done all services since then. Amazing.
 

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2010, Kia Soul +, 5-spd
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Discussion Starter #5
Might be something I need to look into, I've already changed the evap solenoid, gas cap, and the sensor at the rear of the car. The name of that one escapes me right now. After each install I reset the codes and they come back over time.
Kia Soul: Components Location - Evaporative Emission Control System - Emission Control System

if it's the one at the back, it's the Vent Valve, if it's on the fuel tank, it's the Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor. I included a link to the diagram.
 

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2010, Kia Soul +, 5-spd
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Discussion Starter #7
Yup, the vent valve. I thought about pulling the charcoal canister next, but I think I may give the pressure sensor a try first.
Are you having the p0455 code? If so, Try the FTPS (Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor). The tech at Kia said in HIS experience, if it's the p0455 code, It's always either the Gas Cap or the FTPS, usually gas cap, but he said if that doesn't fix it, next step for him his always to test the FTPS. On my car it was reading NEGATIVE 46psi on the sensor. So he's replacing that, and then said I should be good to go.

Thought I'd share what he said. I'm not sure how much of a pain in the butt that is to get to, but let me know what happens if you do switch out the sensor. Kia Part Number for the FTPS is 31435-2J000.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
So a little update for everyone. I'm out in California with my car now, no evap codes. YEA!!!!! (waves arms like Kermit the frog) That Fuel Tank Pressure sensor was the pain of my existence. Oh well. If anyone has any computer code problems that is reading this thread, let me know and I'll try to help the best I can.
 

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So a little update for everyone. I'm out in California with my car now, no evap codes. YEA!!!!! (waves arms like Kermit the frog) That Fuel Tank Pressure sensor was the pain of my existence. Oh well. If anyone has any computer code problems that is reading this thread, let me know and I'll try to help the best I can.
Great that it finally solved the problem. My sensor should be here friday. Hopefully I can get rid of my trouble code.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Great that it finally solved the problem. My sensor should be here friday. Hopefully I can get rid of my trouble code.
Awesome! let me know if that worked for you. I hope that it does. I lucked out, the Kia Dealership I was working with before I moved to CA, only charged me like 50.00 for the sensor and knocked 25/hr off the normal labor to help me out.
 

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Awesome! let me know if that worked for you. I hope that it does. I lucked out, the Kia Dealership I was working with before I moved to CA, only charged me like 50.00 for the sensor and knocked 25/hr off the normal labor to help me out.
Back to the drawing board. It was off until I went to head home this afternoon, it was on when i started the car. I may have to break down and get the smoke test.
 

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Back to the drawing board. It was off until I went to head home this afternoon, it was on when i started the car. I may have to break down and get the smoke test.
Sorry to hear that Pumpkin. Is there any chance the car has to run through the full "cycles" before the computer resets the code (aka: light off)?

How to Perform a Basic Drive Cycle
Here are step-by-step instructions on how to perform a basic, yet very effective, drive cycle that will complete the readiness monitors for your vehicle's emissions control system.
Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle
  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion—not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
Step Four: More City Driving
  • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
  • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
  • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
Step Five: Have your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
  • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
  • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.
  • If your monitors are not ready, please click here for more information.
From: RepairPal
 

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Sorry to hear that Pumpkin. Is there any chance the car has to run through the full "cycles" before the computer resets the code (aka: light off)?

How to Perform a Basic Drive Cycle
Here are step-by-step instructions on how to perform a basic, yet very effective, drive cycle that will complete the readiness monitors for your vehicle's emissions control system.
Step One: How to Prepare Your Vehicle
  • Have the fuel tank between 30 and 70 percent full. Some systems, especially the EVAP system, need to have a specific level of fuel in order for the tests to be trusted. If the fuel tank is near empty or completely full, many of the basic tests will not run at all.
  • The vehicle must also have a good alternator and a strong battery. If you have to occasionally jump-start your vehicle, all of the memory from the powertrain control module (PCM) is erased, which includes the data that accurately tracks the results from various stages of the Drive Cycle. Also, if the battery is weak or undercharged, some of the most important tests will never run.
  • The vehicle must sit overnight, or for at least eight hours, in an environment that is less than 90° F. The engine temperature needs to match the air temperature in order to establish an accurate baseline for the testing. If the outside temperature is over 90° F, the fuel is too volatile and the EVAP system won't even try to run its tests, though some of the other emissions systems may run their tests.
  • The keys must be out of the ignition and all of the doors must be closed while the vehicle sits over night because many of the onboard computers "boot up" when the keys are in the ignition. Also, many of the onboard computers still run until all of the doors are closed after the vehicle is shut off and the keys are removed.
Step Two: The Cold Start
  • Start the vehicle and let it idle for two to three minutes in Park or Neutral. While it is idling, turn on the head lights, heater/defroster, and rear defroster for a three to five minute warm-up phase. Let the idle speed settle down to near the normal speed.
  • Next, put the vehicle in gear and drive through city streets at about 25 mph. Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times before slowing down to stop. Don't roll through the stop; be sure the car is really stopped, just like you learned in driving school. Accelerate from each stop in a normal fashion—not overly conservative, but not like you are competing in a drag race either.
Step Three: A Short Freeway Trip
  • After the vehicle has been cold started and driven for a few miles on city streets, the next step is to take it on a short freeway trip.
  • Enter the freeway on-ramp and allow enough room with respect to other vehicles so that you can do a 1/2 to 3/4 throttle acceleration up to freeway speed.
  • When you have accelerated up to around 60 mph and have safely merged into the flow of traffic, stay in the slow lane and maintain a steady speed of 55 to 60 mph for a minimum of five miles. Please use the cruise control to help you maintain speed.
  • Find a nice, long off ramp to exit from the freeway. As you exit, take your foot off of the accelerator and let the vehicle coast down until it stops under its own power as you complete your exit from the freeway. Do not use the foot brake and do not shift gears until the very end of this "coast down" phase.
Step Four: More City Driving
  • After you have completed the freeway trip, drive through the city streets for a repeat of the second part of Step Two.
  • Go up to about 35 to 40 mph a few times and then maintain a city speed of 25 mph before slowing down to stop. Again, don't roll through the stop and make sure to accelerate normally.
  • Pull in to a parking place and let the engine idle for one to two minutes and then shut it off.
Step Five: Have your Readiness Monitors Checked and Verified
  • Drive your vehicle to your regular shop and have them re-check your readiness monitors, present codes, and pending codes. They should do this as a courtesy and for free.
  • If all of your monitors are "ready" and there are no present or pending codes, then your vehicle has been properly repaired and is ready for an emissions inspection and for normal driving.
  • If your monitors are not ready, please click here for more information.
From: RepairPal
I didnt know it was so involved o clear the code. I just cleared the code with my reader, then drove to and from work the next day, about 65 miles.
 

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Are you having the p0455 code? If so, Try the FTPS (Fuel Tank Pressure Sensor). The tech at Kia said in HIS experience, if it's the p0455 code, It's always either the Gas Cap or the FTPS, usually gas cap, but he said if that doesn't fix it, next step for him his always to test the FTPS. On my car it was reading NEGATIVE 46psi on the sensor. So he's replacing that, and then said I should be good to go.

Thought I'd share what he said. I'm not sure how much of a pain in the butt that is to get to, but let me know what happens if you do switch out the sensor. Kia Part Number for the FTPS is 31435-2J000.
Thank you for sharing this info. I just ordered the sensor. I also have a 2010 2.0L
 
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