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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So...with the release of the 2020's I am "on the fence" about my feelings.
(insert musical interlude) (feelings...whoa whoa whoa feelings...)
Currently I am not in love with the new look especially that HUGE and vulnerable front grill.
Couple that with the dreaded C.V.T. and that fence just got a little higher.
(Maybe the Trump administration is at work here?)
In all fairness I have not seen it in person nor have I driven one.
I can remember not being fond of our current 2012 soul UNTIL I actually spent some time around it and the rest, they say, is history.
Here are some confusing points that perhaps someone can elaborate on?
1-All non-turbo souls are 2.0 BUT only have 147hp? (wasn't that the rating of the 1.6 souls pre 2020?
2-Has Kia dropped the dreaded "direct injection" and gone back to conventional m.p.i?
3-Any detailed feedback on the new c.v.t. transmission and is this Kia's 1st venture using it?
(I prefer not to be Kia's transmission crash test dummy!)
4-What's with the pricing? Seems 2020's are very close and sometimes even cheaper than 2019's similarly equipped.
I've still the opportunity to find a 2019 of my liking but the list continues to dwindle and pricing seems a bit befuddling comparing 2019 to 2020 with not a huge difference between the 2 when similarly equipped.
Please feel free to share here as sharing is caring!
Thanx then!
 

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I just drove my new 2020 across country and it drives much nicer than our 2013. It is more comfortable, smoother driving, and the cvt worked just fine. Also it is lighter and has more torque so the slightly lower hp on the straight 2.0 is still improved.

Perhaps they did let the Trump Administration have a look at it, as it is better.
 

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1. 1.6L - 130 @ 6300; 118 @ 4850; 2.0L - 147 @ 6200; 132 @ 4500
2. 2.0L is MPI, the 1.6L turbo is GDI
3. the IVT has been used in the Forte for the last year. It is an in-house design and built unit.
4. the US has gone more like Canada, by not having as many packages but creating separate models.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I just drove my new 2020 across country and it drives much nicer than our 2013. It is more comfortable, smoother driving, and the cvt worked just fine. Also it is lighter and has more torque so the slightly lower hp on the straight 2.0 is still improved.

Perhaps they did let the Trump Administration have a look at it, as it is better.
A "drive across country" would reveal little about a C.V.T. as theoretically it should be in top gear most of the time.
Where you truly learn about a C.V.T. is in day-day mixed driving where the C.V.T. has an opportunity to shift up/down and emulate a conventional transmission.
Our 2012 2.0 has 164hp from what I recall?
I would expect a better ride and improved fit/finish between the 2020 and the 2013.
If not...Kia would be moving backwards or not at all in improving the brand!
According to my findings 2020 is not lighter but marginally heavier across the model line than 2013.
2020 torque specs are also less in the normally aspirated models (non-turbo) than 2013/2.0.
Where did you get your information from again?
My reference material:
https://www.kiamedia.com/us/en/models/soul/2012/specifications#soul
https://www.kiamedia.com/us/en/models/soul/2020/specifications
 

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Well, I have briefly driven three Souls; a 2012, a 2019 and a 2020. In this admittedly small sample, I found no complaint with the power or handling of any of the three. In stop-and-go traffic, I didn't notice the CVT as objectionable. I did notice it felt somewhat different than a regular AT. I, personally, think the 2020s are more stylish than the Gen 1/2 Souls. I have not been able to find much information on the details of Kia's switch to MPI-was it the carbon problem? Something else? As stated, the CVT was in the Forte last year. I checked Consumer Reports, but they have no data at this time on the reliability of the CVT, although they seemed favorably impressed by the 2018 Forte.
At least in this area, the better 2019's are gone and the ones remaining are the base models with MT. These seem to be priced around $15K US, which is certainly attractive considering Carmax is selling a 2013 with 88K for $9K. However, getting a new 2020 LX for $20K OTD I found more attractive for an extra $5K.

Personally, I would prefer to have a little more information on the Gen 3 drivetrain before plopping down $20K. I'm actually in the process of buying a 2004 Sonata from a FoaF and am hoping to get a year or two out of it while I take care of some other problems and continue to hunt for a new or used Soul or other cargo-style vehicle.
 

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The 2.0 MPI is not new; what is new is the IVT. I had a 2012 Exclaim and it had pretty much the same engine in it. Starting in 2014 the switch to the 2.0 GDI began. In either case, both engines behaved well and had plenty of pick up to put me on the interstate, merge with the big trucks, and cruise at highway speeds up to 65 MPH. After 65 MPH, the MPG fell into the toilet but I was and am satistifed. The 1.6 was GDI already and I do not believe that there is a 1.6 MPI although I would like to drive and know more about the 1.6 Diesel but us Gringos are a funny lot when it comes to a diesel.

Anyway, there are other things that bother me about the 2020s. There really is only three models, the LX MT, the GT Turbo, and the others. The only thing different on the others is bits and pieces stuck on here and there, nothing that is performance related. I personally like the EX the best of all of them but would consider any of the IVTs as suitable.
 

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If you change cars often, go for it. Of course that means you are perpetual paying the de-valuing of the car from the second you drive it off the lot, but that's cool to me, when I am buying them used :)
If you plan to keep it 10 years, I would avoid any Turbo and GDI models. I might worked for you but they have problems, and prompted recalls of 2012-1016 Soul (Hyundai GDI engines).
https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a15342058/hyundai-and-kia-recall-1-2-million-cars-for-engine-failures/
https://finance.yahoo.com/news/kia-hyundai-expand-u-engine-fire-recalls-534-174607407--finance.html
https://www.boston.com/cars/car-news/2019/04/04/hyundai-finds-new-engine-problem-prompting-another-recall

The 1.6L Turbo engine is "pushed" too much IMO.
This is true especially if you drive in a lot of stop-and-go traffic. If you are retired and only drive outside the rush hours, and never accelerate faster than the average snail... not so critical.

As for CVT's, somebody needs to be the guineea pig. Always the "first year" models will have issues to be fixed in later models.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Small displacement engines have always been suitable for turbo charging especially when built ground-up for one.
I really can't see the 1.6 being "pushed" too hard at 201hp and I'm sure a safe boost of around 3-6 lbs.
There's probably quite a bit of undiscovered H.P. lurking inside via higher boost, bigger turbo or some electronic tweaking.
It seems any 3 letter abbreviation just spells (abbreviates) trouble.
DCT, CVT, IVT, GDI and the list goes on...
If you lease, little of these things need really concern you as you'll only have to live with the misgivings a relatively short time.
If you own however and keep a vehicle for 5-10 years, these shortcomings may be of concern sometime down the road.
 

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GDI: Later models may have valve timing changed to avoid/reduce carbon build-up. Short trips, especially start/stop, not driving long enough for oil to reach full operating temp, is not good for any internal combustion engine. Attached photo of spark plug at 2546 miles was taken a few minutes ago. It is burning clean.

CVT: Don't like the sudden increase in RPMs when accelerating, at least on earlier models.

2019 vs 2020: I like my 2019, especially since I added cruise, last week.

1.6 vs 2.0: Normally I go for the larger engine, but wanted a manual 6 speed, so I have the 1.6 GDI.

a. The 1.6 can cruise at 90 MPH, under 4,000 RPMs

b. Coming back from Death Valley last week, where Nevada highway 95 is a two lane I passed a truck, doing under the 70 MPH speed limit and hit 90 MPH as I cleared him, without down shifting from 6th.

c. Overall MPG for over a 300 mile trip (tier one fuel) was 37 MPG with tires inflated to 44 PSI, cold (might drop a couple PSI during summer)

Even my base model is smooth and quiet enough that my wife does not notice 80 to even 90 MPH (have not tested above 90)

2546 miles.jpg

Cornering and steering is excellent, just in normal mode. Going over Jubilee Pass from Shoshone to Badwater was very enjoyable...approaching the satisfaction I had from my 2003 Miata/MX5. Only negative was the demise of too many butterflies.
 

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c. Overall MPG for over a 300 mile trip (tier one fuel) was 37 MPG with tires inflated to 44 PSI, cold (might drop a couple PSI during summer)

Even my base model is smooth and quiet enough that my wife does not notice 80 to even 90 MPH (have not tested above 90)
2016 base stick, no issues accelerating up to 110mph. Takes a bit to get there once you're over 95-100, but it'll get there at a decent clip.

My wife averaged 36mpg at 33psi tire pressure driving highway stints inside the city limits. You shouldn't need to overinflate and compromise grip to get good gas mileage out of the car.
 

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I guess one of you even drove a 6 cyl car that is rated "only" 170-200HP. The noise, vibrations, that this little 2.0L 4 cyl engine does in order to deliver the power is astonishing to me. I test drove 1.6L engines, all the newer GDI engines, and they are even worse. My Sonata with 2.5L DOHC V6 (yr 2000, belt timing), with only 162HP, sounds so much nicer when accelerating hard. Why? I don't know... typical V6 balancing versus I4 banging? Maybe the mechanical adjusted, solid, lifters versus hydraulic ones?
Same for my other 3.0L Ford DOHC engine (2001, chain timing).

I guess there is a reason why they reverted to MPI for model yr 2020. Maybe the cost of all those engines catching fire...

Also, over-inflating the tires over the label value doesn't improve any gas mileage. Just adds wear to the tires and stress on the suspension components. Engineers that designed that tire label were not idiots.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Sonic Said: "I guess one of you even drove a 6 cyl car that is rated "only" 170-200HP."

Well...I Do drive a 1987 300zx that does fall into that category.
The whirring noise that comes from under that hood is unmistakably Nissan ZX!
No ball of fire but torquey enough to satiate as a daily driver, especially if you don't over drive the 30+ year old chassis.
 

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My wife averaged 36mpg at 33psi tire pressure driving highway stints inside the city limits.
Yes, lower speeds are even more economical. On my 300+ mile Death Valley trip, the last leg of ~112 miles from Beatty to home, was at a median speed of ~75 MPH, with one burst to 90 MPH to pass, still averaging 37 MPG. Whereas driving around Lake Mead at 45-55 MPH yields 40.0 MPG.

40 MPG.jpg
 

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Also, over-inflating the tires over the label value doesn't improve any gas mileage. Just adds wear to the tires and stress on the suspension components.
Stock (Kuhmo) tires max inflation, as indicated on the sidewall, is 44 PSI
Door sticker and manual recommend less, primarily for comfort.
Cornering is very stable.
More inflation = less sidewall flex.
The slightly harsher ride is barely perceptible.
What MPG do you get at door sticker PSI?
 

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Well...I Do drive a 1987 300zx that does fall into that category.
The whirring noise that comes from under that hood is unmistakably Nissan ZX!
With the sale of my 2014 Honda CB1100 (1140 cc 4 cyl 0-60 in 3.3 sec) the 2019 Soul shares our garage with a 2016 Nissan Frontier 4WD. It is great for trips to our Arizona ranch. The 4.0 is a stroked 3.5 with great torque. It is close to perfect (not the best turning radius) for our use, but the Soul 1.6, idling at only 650 RPM is smoother. BTW, according to a friend, who was a Nissan service manager, the Frontier and Z are the most reliable of late model Nissans.
 

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Stock (Kuhmo) tires max inflation, as indicated on the sidewall, is 44 PSI
Door sticker and manual recommend less, primarily for comfort.
Max inflation is just that - MAXIMUM. They can be used in variou scars, not only in yours, so they have to be covered. And that pressure is "MAX" while they are hot. Do you think that the OE tires have less "max inflation" written on them???

The sticker applies for any tire you install. If you think you know better then the people that made the car, more power to you. Just don't complain when you will have bad ball joints, leaky shocks, squeaky bushings (and generally a more "wobbly" car due to those issues).
Or when you hard break and end up sliding in someone's rear end, because your tire contact patch is smaller than normal. Or when you take a turn too fast on rain and do a 180 into the guard rail, for the same reason.
 
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