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So no worries with using CRC possibly fouling up a sensor on the Gen2s?
Have you tried CRC yourself? Anything else I would need to be watching out for if using it according to its general instructions?
Thanks!
I use either CRC or one of the other cleaners before every oil change. But usually I remove the intake duct and spray it directly into the throttle body. On a few occasions when I've been lazy or pressed for time, however, I sprayed it into the brake booster vacuum line. That probably works just as well for the valves, but maybe not as well for the butterfly.

If I were asked what is the "right way" to do it, I'd say remove the duct and spray it directly into the throttle body.

Richard
 

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If I were asked what is the "right way" to do it, I'd say remove the duct and spray it directly into the throttle body.

That's how I plan to apply it, but next Spring when it's warmer out! 👍

May I ask, have you experienced any issues afterwards with performance or any codes thrown? I ask because I watched the YT video below (@8:46) where the guy was out running his 30 minute highway drive after the "soak" and his engine sputtered and bogged down enough where he felt he needed to take it into the shop. It could have been an unrelated issue with his particular engine, but I would rather avoid a trip to the dealership if I can avoid it, LOL.

Also, in the video he mentioned hearing a "rattling" noise (@9:40), could that have been loosening deposits hitting the cat? Wouldn't that be bad for the cat? Have you personally ever heard any noises or engine sputters after a CRC treatment?

 

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That's how I plan to apply it, but next Spring when it's warmer out! 👍

May I ask, have you experienced any issues afterwards with performance or any codes thrown? I ask because I watched the YT video below (@8:46) where the guy was out running his 30 minute highway drive after the "soak" and his engine sputtered and bogged down enough where he felt he needed to take it into the shop. It could have been an unrelated issue with his particular engine, but I would rather avoid a trip to the dealership if I can avoid it, LOL.

Also, in the video he mentioned hearing a "rattling" noise (@9:40), could that have been loosening deposits hitting the cat? Wouldn't that be bad for the cat? Have you personally ever heard any noises or engine sputters after a CRC treatment?

I've never had any issues at all except a bit of hesitation when whatever small amount of solvent that puddles in the throttle body gets sucked into the intake. That always happens because not all of it gets drawn into the manifold during application. There will always be a few drops that puddle on the bottom of the throttle body.

For me to get to the road where I do the drive, I have to coast down a hill and drive at about 30 mph for a short distance before I gun the engine. That's when the hesitation happens. I suppose I could avoid it by wiping the bottom of the throttle body before I replace the duct, but I haven't bothered so far.

Other than that, I've had no issues at all.

I doubt that any loosened carbon would have any effect on the CAT. In the big picture of what it endures on a regular basis, my guess is that it's a non-event. But an automotive engineer would know better that I would.

Richard
 

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I've never had any issues at all except a bit of hesitation when whatever small amount of solvent that puddles in the throttle body gets sucked into the intake. That always happens because not all of it gets drawn into the manifold during application. There will always be a few drops that puddle on the bottom of the throttle body.

For me to get to the road where I do the drive, I have to coast down a hill and drive at about 30 mph for a short distance before I gun the engine. That's when the hesitation happens. I suppose I could avoid it by wiping the bottom of the throttle body before I replace the duct, but I haven't bothered so far.

Other than that, I've had no issues at all.

I doubt that any loosened carbon would have any effect on the CAT. In the big picture of what it endures on a regular basis, my guess is that it's a non-event. But an automotive engineer would know better that I would.

Richard

Thank you for sharing your experience with the CRC treatment. I have a feeling the issues the guy in the video experienced had nothing to do with the treatment.
 

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Question regarding MAP sensor...

Can a scan of a good MAP sensor give an indication of a leak in the intake?

Reason I ask is because I had scanned my MAP sensor, and comparing the readings to specs, it seems that the readings from the scan indicates that there is 34 kpa at idle and the specs states 20 kpa at idle. Could it be that there is a small amount of unmetered air (leak) causing less vacuum at idle? What I'm understanding is that when the throttle is closed at idle, the vacuum increases and pressure is low. The 14 kpa difference would indicate there is unmetered air entering the intake, which reducing vacuum, would that be right?

Pardon, I'm just learning this stuff, and like most, I'm trying to rule out things before condemning my catalytic converter.
 

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Question regarding MAP sensor...

Can a scan of a good MAP sensor give an indication of a leak in the intake?

Reason I ask is because I had scanned my MAP sensor, and comparing the readings to specs, it seems that the readings from the scan indicates that there is 34 kpa at idle and the specs states 20 kpa at idle. Could it be that there is a small amount of unmetered air (leak) causing less vacuum at idle? What I'm understanding is that when the throttle is closed at idle, the vacuum increases and pressure is low. The 14 kpa difference would indicate there is unmetered air entering the intake, which reducing vacuum, would that be right?

Pardon, I'm just learning this stuff, and like most, I'm trying to rule out things before condemning my catalytic converter.
There could be a leak. Vacuum is usually high at idle for the reasons you mention. It's even higher when going downhill in a MT vehicle (or an AT vehicle with a lower gear manually selected) because the pistons are trying to gulp air while the butterfly is closed.

It certainly would be worth checking out. Ruling out (and, usually, fixing) vacuum leaks is a lot easier than replacing a CAT.

Richard
 

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I popped into the Kia dealership a couple of days ago and asked a fellow in the service department a bunch of questions. Here is what I learned.

The use of CRC GDI IVD Intake Valve and Turbo Cleaner does not void the warranty.

I confirmed that the use of CRC GDI IVD Intake Valve and Turbo Cleaner and similar do not hurt the MAPS or the IATS.

The dealership does carry Kia Injector Cleaner additive which I did not buy but does not carry Kia Throttle Body and Plate cleaner. It was suggested to me that I buy a 3rd party cleaner to do that. I already have a can which I carry in the Nissan Xterra.

I asked about a motor oil additive that 'flushes' the engine. Not recommended. That was after I pointed out how quickly engine motor oil in the Kia Soul darkens up with use.

Once the vehicles acquire over 100,000 km (62K miles), the dealer will directly clean the injectors, mostly on a case by case basis. (That is something I plan on having done as the vehicle approaches mid-life as a maintenance item.)

Later at Canadian Tire -- we affectionately call it Crappy Tire -- I bought a can of aerosol CRC GDI IVD Intake Valve and Turbo Cleaner to have on hand. And then picked up 5 litres of 5W20 Pennzoil Ultra Platinum Synthetic Engine Oil which was on sale for the next oil change. I would like to keep this 2015 Kia Soul until close to 400,000 km (~250K miles) if at all possible.
 

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After about 100 cans you may have cleaned the valves!
Pretty much, if you start late. Chemicals do a less-than-wonderful job of removing heavy deposits.

The key is to start early. If you start early and make it a regular maintenance item (before every oil change), you may prevent the deposits from getting to the point that they cause performance issues (assuming you also follow good practice regarding the choice of an appropriate oil that will provide source minimization).

A catch can would be even better. The main problem with that is that an especially dopey inspector may fail the car for "modification of emissions-control system," which would bring all kinds of wrath upon the car's owner. I tell people if they want to install a catch can, keep the original hose and revert to stock when getting the car inspected. (The reality, of course, is that a properly-installed close-loop catch can will reduce emissions, if it has any effect at all.)

As for CRC, polyether amine does in fact remove carbon deposits. There's no doubt about that. The problem is that there's only so deep it will penetrate. If the deposits are heavy, it will only remove the outer layer that it can get to. There also are limitations to how thoroughly it can get to all the surfaces that need to be cleaned. You're pretty much shooting into the dark and hoping you hit something.

It will do no harm, however; and if started early in the engine's life, it may just delay carbon deposits from getting to the point that they affect the car's performance.

In other words, as I often say, "Can't hurt, might help."

Richard
 

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The catch-can definitely works in capturing some oil from going into the valves. I have been using one very early on in my Soul. Also make sure the proper oil is being used by the dealer or the provider. My manual states that "Total " is the recommended oil for KIA and it meets the API recommendations of KIA. I looked into their catalog and found that the one called Total Quartz INEO MC3 is recommended for KIA/Hyundai. It is low SAPs and the bottle indicates it is designed for direct injected turbo and non-turbo engines. I use 5w/30 and at 40k have not had consumption issues in my 1.6 base engine. I also have a 2020 Sportage (wife) and my mother in-law has a 209 Soul with the 2.0 and they get the same oil upto now (low mileage till now), no issues with consumption as of now. Time will tell
 

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My dealer also uses Total oil and advertises oil/filter change at $39.95; however at this price its a synthetic blend. U pay extra if you want full syn.
 

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My dealer also uses Total oil and advertises oil/filter change at $39.95; however at this price its a synthetic blend. U pay extra if you want full syn.
Here also but exactly that, a syn blend, I buy the one I use in the range of $7-$9 a quart and do 5k OCIs. Pricey but it seems to work good and it also states that is designed for "sporty driving" lol which i like
 

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My dealer also uses Total oil and advertises oil/filter change at $39.95; however at this price its a synthetic blend. U pay extra if you want full syn.
I do full synthetic at the dealer. Not sure what brand they use, but they charge $59 (OTD), which s reasonable to me.

Sent from my SM-T820 using Tapatalk
 

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......
As for CRC, polyether amine does in fact remove carbon deposits. There's no doubt about that. The problem is that there's only so deep it will penetrate. If the deposits are heavy, it will only remove the outer layer that it can get to. There also are limitations to how thoroughly it can get to all the surfaces that need to be cleaned. You're pretty much shooting into the dark and hoping you hit something.
......
I recall from a while back when we drove a WD-21 Nissan Pathfinder (truck chassis-based) that some folks with older pathfinders would switch to synthetic motor oil from conventional motor oil and then complain about getting leaks for the first time.

In fact, IIRC, there were some 4X4 owners who would dump synthetic oil into the motor as an oil flush prior to doing a change.

I put the pathfinder on a steady diet of synthetic oil (Mobil 1) right after it was purchased at circa 100,000 km (62K miles).

The one time it leaked, I solved that problem by gently tightening the headers. It leaked one other time due to the good folks at Mr. Lube overfilling the motor with oil. Otherwise, not a drop.

All this to say, I am counting on high quality synthetic motor oil to keep the valves clean. It is more the injectors that concern me.
 

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I recall from a while back when we drove a WD-21 Nissan Pathfinder (truck chassis-based) that some folks with older pathfinders would switch to synthetic motor oil from conventional motor oil and then complain about getting leaks for the first time.

In fact, IIRC, there were some 4X4 owners who would dump synthetic oil into the motor as an oil flush prior to doing a change.

I put the pathfinder on a steady diet of synthetic oil (Mobil 1) right after it was purchased at circa 100,000 km (62K miles).

The one time it leaked, I solved that problem by gently tightening the headers. It leaked one other time due to the good folks at Mr. Lube overfilling the motor with oil. Otherwise, not a drop.

All this to say, I am counting on high quality synthetic motor oil to keep the valves clean. It is more the injectors that concern me.
Actually, the first PAO-based full-synthetics released to the consumer automobile market back in the 1970's did in fact often cause leaks, and not only in older cars. PAO tends to cause seals to shrink, and the earliest synthetics had no additives to specifically address that issue. (Diester-based synthetics, on the other hand, tend to swell seals.)

The other reason why synthetics can "cause leaks" is kind of a bum rap. In older cars whose seals are already worn, sludge buildup may be serving as a seal, of sorts; and when the synthetic breaks down the sludge, the seals start to leak.

Richard
 

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I recall from a while back when we drove a WD-21 Nissan Pathfinder (truck chassis-based) that some folks with older pathfinders would switch to synthetic motor oil from conventional motor oil and then complain about getting leaks for the first time.

In fact, IIRC, there were some 4X4 owners who would dump synthetic oil into the motor as an oil flush prior to doing a change.

I put the pathfinder on a steady diet of synthetic oil (Mobil 1) right after it was purchased at circa 100,000 km (62K miles).

The one time it leaked, I solved that problem by gently tightening the headers. It leaked one other time due to the good folks at Mr. Lube overfilling the motor with oil. Otherwise, not a drop.

All this to say, I am counting on high quality synthetic motor oil to keep the valves clean. It is more the injectors that concern me.
Interesting idea. I have heard a couple mechanics quip that synthetic is so good that it "over lubricates" & is too much for some engines. Way above my pay grade :)
 
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