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Dexos 1 is a GM-specific standard that came out a while ago (I'd guess about 10 years, but I don't have the time to look it up at the moment). As I recall, they were concerned mainly with low-temperature flowability and SAPS evel. At the time, it was a superior standard. Nowadays, pretty much any decent oil will meet the Dexos 1 specs.

The newer revision of the standard is Dexos 2, which I believe added some additional requirements for volatility (Noack and TEOST). Again, I can't look this up at the moment, but I'm pretty sure that's what changed from Dexos Gen1 to Gen2.

Group 3 refers to the base oil, which in this case would be a highly-refined crude oil that meats the non-existent standards to be called "synthetic." Neither API nor SAE define exactly was "synthetic" means, however; so you're pretty much trusting the manufacturer's reputation for Group 3 oils.

Without knowing the brand name and specific label, that's all I can say. Neither Dexos standard is considered the pinnacle of oil technology nowadays, but an oil meeting either standard will at least not be crap. If you can find out the specific oil, we can learn more about its properties.

Run-Rite has been around for a while. It doesn't do anything all that different from what a can of any decent intake cleaner will do, but it does it without having to stand there and hold the can. It's a convenience more than any sort of magic. You can do the same thing yourself with a can of CRC, Seafoam, Lucas, etc. and a helper to maintain the RPM while you're doing it.

Richard

Thank you for that oil lesson, it really helps me understand things. I'll make sure to go with the next time my wife takes it in for an oil change and ask questions, especially since it wasn't taken to a Jiffy Lube type of place, but an actual auto mechanic shop. In fact the same shop that the previous owner used exclusively, according to the maintenance records on the CarFax. Not that many shops seem to register their work with CarFax, this place does. At least this is what I'm deducing from reading a load of CarFaxes when I was looking for a car鈥攎aintenance records were somewhat rare. The shop has a good reputation.

As for Run-Rite, they had a video for that GDI kit and it seemed that it didn't do much different that a can of CRC or Seafoam. I'll stick with one of those! 馃憤
 

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In all seriousness, unless you're learning some specific profession that absolutely requires a college degree, there's little need to go to college anymore. Literally anything you need to know is right there on the Interwebs.

Richard
Here Here Richard! I regularly attend YouTube University to solve just about any problem or procedure. The ability to maximize the "search engine" is a must have skill these days :)
 

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I thought the whole point of having the really high injection pressure was to spray the fuel in during the compression stroke, as close to the firing time as possible. If they were spraying it in during intake, then the pressure could be much lower like all the old multi-point injection schemes.
Not exactly the question you asked, but injecting into the cylinders, the fuel is cooler (doesn't pick up heat from valves), which allows for higher compression resulting in better performance and gas mileage. This is what started the trend to GDI engines.

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Chemical cleaning will clean , but only to a certain point. We scoped my coworkers truck on day prior to service and then one day after service. Yes the chemical did remove a good amount of carbon and oil residue. There was still areas of carbon and oil residue build up. My self , I went a different route, I removed the intake and walnut media blasted the intake runners and valves. Yeah no arguing the results. This method rendered the best results that I have seen. 3wks later scoped all four pistons , carbon as expected on top of pistons. Ran a cleaner to address this , specifically this. Installed a catch can soon after. 3000 miles render 1 ounce of oily residue. Oil consumption at zero , level checked weekly. Installed a oil pressure gauge to keep tabs on oil pressure before trip. Major road trip with the family this August , 1,700 miles driven. Oil consumption was 1/2qt , oil checked at every fuel stop and once at home. Recent oil change netted 1 ounce from catch can. Weekly oil level checks , 0 oil consumption.
 

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Chemical cleaning will clean , but only to a certain point. We scoped my coworkers truck on day prior to service and then one day after service. Yes the chemical did remove a good amount of carbon and oil residue. There was still areas of carbon and oil residue build up. My self , I went a different route, I removed the intake and walnut media blasted the intake runners and valves. Yeah no arguing the results. This method rendered the best results that I have seen. 3wks later scoped all four pistons , carbon as expected on top of pistons. Ran a cleaner to address this , specifically this. Installed a catch can soon after. 3000 miles render 1 ounce of oily residue. Oil consumption at zero , level checked weekly. Installed a oil pressure gauge to keep tabs on oil pressure before trip. Major road trip with the family this August , 1,700 miles driven. Oil consumption was 1/2qt , oil checked at every fuel stop and once at home. Recent oil change netted 1 ounce from catch can. Weekly oil level checks , 0 oil consumption.
Outstanding! Thanks for sharing.

The chemical cleaners, even when used regularly, do have their limits. Usually those limits are below the point that the amount of carbon has any noticeable effect, but not always. Still, as your pictures prove, there's still no such thing as a mechanic in a can. They also prove that this is a real problem and that it is oil-related, just in case there were any doubters left.

Richard
 

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Following this thread with great interest. I just had the 60K oil change done on my 2016+. It's been burning about a quart every ~1500 miles. I was told by the dealer that they don't care until it gets to a quart every 1,000 miles. I have the dealer do the changes, they put in 5-20W conventional mobile oil. I can't find that oil anywhere around here. The service manager said that I could use any brand regular oil when needing to add a quart. I'm hoping to get another 100k at least out of this engine.
Jim
 

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Following this thread with great interest. I just had the 60K oil change done on my 2016+. It's been burning about a quart every ~1500 miles. I was told by the dealer that they don't care until it gets to a quart every 1,000 miles. I have the dealer do the changes, they put in 5-20W conventional mobile oil. I can't find that oil anywhere around here. The service manager said that I could use any brand regular oil when needing to add a quart. I'm hoping to get another 100k at least out of this engine.
Jim
Jim, what motor...1.6 or 2.0? Sorry to be a pessimist, but if its using that much oil now, doubt you'll get a 100K more out of it.
 

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Following this thread with great interest. I just had the 60K oil change done on my 2016+. It's been burning about a quart every ~1500 miles. I was told by the dealer that they don't care until it gets to a quart every 1,000 miles. I have the dealer do the changes, they put in 5-20W conventional mobile oil. I can't find that oil anywhere around here. The service manager said that I could use any brand regular oil when needing to add a quart. I'm hoping to get another 100th at least out of this engine.
Jim
Hi Jim, FWIW if I was in your situation, I would rather quickly switch over to 5w-30 full synthetic with SN+ rating. Even Amazon sells their own brand. I'd also make sure your PCV valve has been replaced along with a good clean air filter. None of these things are expensive & might mitigate this rather rapid oil disappearance.
 

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Following this thread with great interest. I just had the 60K oil change done on my 2016+. It's been burning about a quart every ~1500 miles. I was told by the dealer that they don't care until it gets to a quart every 1,000 miles. I have the dealer do the changes, they put in 5-20W conventional mobile oil. I can't find that oil anywhere around here. The service manager said that I could use any brand regular oil when needing to add a quart. I'm hoping to get another 100k at least out of this engine.
Jim
Your local Walmart should have roughly a bazillion bottles of 5W-20 conventional on the shelves. Every major manufacturer makes a 5W-20 conventional. Even Amazon has one out. Most of them meet API SN / RC requirements. A few meet SN Plus. I'm not aware of any that meet ACEA A5 (nor am I even sure that's possible).

If I were in your position, I'd do (or pay a mechanic to do) a valve cleaning (and possibly a piston soak if a borescope reveals the rings to be a mess), and do a short OCI (500 - 1,000 miles) oil and filter change immediately thereafter with an oil that meets both API CK-4 and SN requirements (for example, Rotella T6 5W-30, but there are others). Oils that are rated for diesel engines have much stronger detergents, and they tend to dislodge a lot of gunk. That's why I would keep that OCI short. It might clog the filter from all the sludge it dislodges.

I'd then drain the Rotella and do another oil and filter change with something like Castrol Edge Titanium 5W-30 or Penn Plat 5W-30. I'd keep that OCI on the short side, too (maybe 3,000 miles). I'd continue using that oil until something better comes along.

My reason for not using a diesel-rated oil forever would be that even dual-rated oils (CK-4 and SN) tend to have SAPS at the upper extreme of the allowable ranges for SN, which is not good news for the CAT. There's such a thing as barely meeting a standard, and most of the diesel-rated lubes barely meet SN standards for SAPS.

I'd also put a can of Techron in the gas tank. It doesn't do much for the valves in a GDI engine, but it seems to help a bit (and certainly won't hurt) with carbon in the combustion chamber.

Richard
 

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"My reason for not using a diesel-rated oil forever would be that even dual-rated oils (CK-4 and SN) tend to have SAPS at the upper extreme of the allowable ranges for SN, which is not good news for the CAT. There's such a thing as barely meeting a standard, and most of the diesel-rated lubes barely meet SN standards for SAPS."

I have used Rotella 5w-40 diesel rated full synthetic since new in my '99 Econoline V-6 with 103K miles! Have not heard a peep from my Cat! :LOL:
 

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"My reason for not using a diesel-rated oil forever would be that even dual-rated oils (CK-4 and SN) tend to have SAPS at the upper extreme of the allowable ranges for SN, which is not good news for the CAT. There's such a thing as barely meeting a standard, and most of the diesel-rated lubes barely meet SN standards for SAPS."

I have used Rotella 5w-40 diesel rated full synthetic since new in my '99 Econoline V-6 with 103K miles! Have not heard a peep from my Cat! :LOL:
It's a cumulative thing. Sulfur and phosphorus are inherently damaging to the catalyst; so in theory, the higher the SAPS, the more damage, and the shorter the CAT's life. But that could mean 185,000 miles versus 200,000. It doesn't mean the CAT will die next Tuesday.

I've had cars with as much as 225,000 miles, however; so I tend to think long term.

Richard
 
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