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So, a knocking noise at 49 miles while it was still on the lot. The leather on the steering wheel was torn when I bought the car. Had to get a new steering wheel. The dashboard ends up getting scratched during installation. Then when they fix that they end up scratching the hell out of the new wheel. Then upon inspection the leather is kind of wrinkled and such, and my advisor says to deal with it and it'll go away as I drive. It hasn't. Then at about 500 miles the CD player stopped working and they had to replace the entire radio unit. Now there is an incessant squeaking coming from the tailgate area when I have nothing back there. It occurs every time I hit a bump or an imperfection in the road. Lately the brakes have started squealing intermittently. Especially at slow speeds. Got ANOTHER appointment at my dealer to get the car looked at tomorrow. I called KIA Corporate today, and all the stuff is getting sent to the regional office for review. Despite the fact that these are minor problems, they should not be occurring on a new car with only 650 miles on it. Something isn't right here. The sales manager is trying to get a straight swap done where they take my car back and give me another one thats on the lot. With no money out of my pocket, however this has to come from the higher-ups. Headaches here I come.
 

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used to own a 2016 Soul SX 2.0L - Caribbean Blue
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if he had a good dealer all those problems should easily be rectified without much problem, most sounds very minor. Switch dealers if possible or talk to the dealer head to let them know what is happening and why you are not getting satisfaction.

Can't see getting another vehicle for minor things like this, but sounds like the sales manager is trying.
 

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Q.O.T.D: "Can't see getting another vehicle for minor things like this, but sounds like the sales manager is trying."

Dog & pony show, no doubt...
 

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Absolutamente! (Definitely!)
 

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Baby powder or cornstarch can cure the squeaky door and hatch seals. Dust it on a cloth and wipe the rubber parts down. Brake dust will cause the brakes to squeal even on brand new pads and discs. But it sounds to me like they should be giving you a different vehicle and selling that one to a parts yard before it becomes a liability with all of the other problems it is having.
 

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You buy new,it should act new. With all the usually well-deserved props given Kia products,your car would make me unhappy/uneasy.

ONE more fix attempt(everything as NEW),and if anything else goes awry,get me a different car,paying slight miles penalty only.

Good luck,most Kia's are put together at least as well as any other car.
 

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It does make one wonder, since most of Kia's assembly is done with Robots. But assembly is only as good as the parts being assembled. A robot can't really SEE the part to know if it's defective or not. So it's really possible that a robot can pick up a defective part and put it on a new car and never know the difference. If some human inspector doesn't catch it.....out it goes to the dealers.

We used to joke about cars being built on Fridays, when all the assemblers (real people) were thinking about the weekend and partying, BBQ'ing, drinking, etc. A really bad car (lemon) was always thought to be a Friday car.
Monday cars weren't thought to be a lot better.....hangovers you know.

I guess I've been lucky, , , my last few cars were probably Wednesday cars, when everyone was really paying attention to what they were doing.
My little Gertrude is absolutely as perfect as any new car I've ever bought.

What more can I say?

:cool:
 

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I A robot can't really SEE the part to know if it's defective or not. So it's really possible that a robot can pick up a defective part and put it on a new car and never know the difference. If some human inspector doesn't catch it.....out it goes to the dealers.
Actually with the imaging and laser measuring technology that's available, robots are actually better at "seeing" defective parts than humans.

This is just an anecdotal example but I witnessed it firsthand. For a few years I worked for a printing supply company that provided graphics, pad printers, and automated printing systems for a number of automotive suppliers.

That company supplies the ink, pads, and machines to the plastics company that makes engine covers for GM, Hyundai/Kia, and Toyota vehicles assembled in the US.

Anyway, one of their clients got a contract to make new gas caps for FoMoCo. Because of evaporative emissions rules, the gas caps had to be manufactured within a tolerance of about .01mm from the standard. Also, the lettering printed on it had to be placed within .025mm of the standard.

To have a person inspect each piece would be ridiculous -- especially for a company running 2 shifts and producing ~2 million of these gas caps per year, in addition to all the other plastic products they make.

So they install a laser and camera system on the conveyors to image and measure each gas cap as it comes down the assembly line. That system costs about $50k per assembly line but it automatically rejects and recycles any piece that doesn't meet the tolerance requirements. To watch it in action is pretty cool.

To be fair, the system is only as good as the people programming it, but they're also experts who get paid six-figure salaries to make sure parts are made properly.




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Imaging systems are pretty darn good these days. If you run millions of pop corn kernels through one a minute and tell it to throw out all the square ones, it will do just exactly that. Pick out the square ones and get rid of them with precisely aimed shots of air.
 

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Imaging systems are pretty darn good these days. If you run millions of pop corn kernels through one a minute and tell it to throw out all the square ones, it will do just exactly that. Pick out the square ones and get rid of them with precisely aimed shots of air.
Oh yeah. I got to see the gas cap one in action. They're actually molded in a few separate parts but it's all just on one line. First the screw part came out of the mold and on to a conveyor belt where it was flipped upright and imaged/measured by a laser. The bad ones were kicked out and thrown into a recycling bin. Then they were washed, dried, and tossed back into the vat of molten plastic.

The top half would come through the same way but it would be printed with a pad and baked for a few minutes to expedite ink curing.

Almost all of those things are pneumatically operated. Many of the giant boxes you see on top of or behind factories are air compressors.

A relatively clean, well-organized manufacturing shop is a pretty wonderful place to be.
ImageUploadedByAG Free1378612188.608569.jpg


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Fifty years ago we used to operate heavy hydraulic machinery. It could move material so fast that your eye did not detect the movement. Things have only gotten better in most realms since then and I am never surprised at what can be achieved by machinery any more. It is always, at least to me, a wonder. I used to think a few seconds was fast but when I got into computer clock timing, time took on a more relative POV for me. Now a milli second can be an eternity.
 

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Where I work, we make manual and power seat adjusters for various auto manufacturers (including Kia!). The tolerances are so tight that we scrap seats that appear to be fine to the naked eye.
Dimensions, slide effort, tilt effort, and auto return force are all things that are measured by machine.
Welds are all done by robot, and those specs are even tighter. One example is a 60/40 rear bench we make - the 60% side has over 60 different welds. If total offset of parts measurement is over .25mm the seat is scrapped. Seats are constantly cut apart for weld analysis - if penetration or angle is off the seat is scrapped.

Nearly all checks are done by machine.


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