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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I have a weird issue that is driving me crazy. Just had new "aftermarket" pads and rotors (from Autozone) installed in the front and right after, I get this strange snap type noise, only when the car is warm and has been driven for a bit to "heat up" brakes and when only going in reverse, I get a sudden pop type noise kind of like a quick snap coming from the front left side while applying the brake. So, my mechanic replaces the left side caliper where the original noise came from thinking the calipers were sticking somehow with new brakes and rotors. Noise goes away and then now is on the right. So we change out the right side caliper and the noise goes back to the left!

All pads and rotors and hoses have been checked and rechecked. The only thing they did note is that the right side caliper is not as snug as the left side. The mechanic said the left side is very tight the way that caliper was remanufactured. I also noticed that the right side caliper has a different coating that is completely different from the left, almost like the calipers dont match, but they are the right parts.

Their solution is to replace the left caliper again in hopes it will resolve the problem. Otherwise they said, I may be better off replacing all to oem. I did read that kia souls perform much better with their brake system with oem parts but I am going crazy as to what is causing this and my mechanic is stumped and seems to think I just got some defective aftermarket parts. I had brakes replaced previous though that were aftermarket and did not have this problem, though those brakes would rub like crazy when braking.

Please help, I appreciate a solution to anyone who has experienced this and what they did to resolve it.

thank you
 

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I have aftermarket drilled and slotted rotors and ceramic pads. No issues at all for a couple of years, could be the Autozone parts are cheap. Did the screws that hold the rotor to the hubs get reinstalled?
 
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Discussion Starter #6
here is what I realized last night. I took a look at the calipers on both sides of the front, and I decided to see if the caliper moved by hand. The right one, when you hold the caliper, can definitely be moved by hand causing a slight knocking, in which I do hear over bumps as well when driving. its like the caliper bolt is not holding the pad correctly or either the pad is shifting in the caliper or the caliper itself is loose. The left side (driver side) caliper is tight and has no noise whatsoever when you grab it and try moving it. Though, the LEFT side is the side that the snap/pop type noise is coming from when shifting into reverse after the car has been driven for about 10-15 minutes so the pads and rotors heat up- The noise only occurs one time when going in reverse and is heard immediately while applying the brake in reverse. I wonder if the left side because it is tight, is causing more weight transferred to it because the right (passenger) side is loose, and the left side as a result, becomes stressed and shifts the caliper/pads on the left to work harder causing that initial noise while in reverse. This noise does not occur at all when the vehicle is cold. Also, the left front rotor is running hotter than the right side at this point. My husband thinks the caliper bolt on right is stripped, being used so many times, that it is not supporting the caliper anymore (even though the caliper is brand new). He said the bolts are usually reused when doing caliper replacement. Is this true?
 

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Yes, you usually just reuse the caliper bolts because they're sliding pin design - they have a smooth shoulder that the caliper can ride in and out on. The threads bottom out at the right torque and the caliper just rides on those 2 bolts. If the caliper is loose and can be moved by hand, assuming both caliper bolts are installed, that means the caliper piston is stuck/hanging up in the bore. In other words, it's not working properly. Once you step on the brakes once or twice, the caliper piston will be tight against the inner brake pad, such that you typically have to use a large C-clamp to push the caliper back into the bore in order to remove it to change the brake pads.

If you can move the caliper with your hands after using the brakes a couple of times it's frozen and you need a new caliper. Assuming both bolts are in place.

How many miles on your car? Based on what you posted, I would replace both calipers with new ones from Kia. Remanufactured calipers are notoriously crappy, as rust and other contamination builds up in the caliper bore and the caliper piston has very tight tolerance levels to the bore. I've used reman'd calipers before on other vehicles with mixed results. Typically the work (and mess) of having to change the caliper a couple of times to get a good one warrants just getting brand new OEM from the beginning.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Newest UPDATE: JdMartin....you were right! Are you ready? You may never guess what the problem was....so, the calipers were from AutoZone, not that it is a bad thing, however, if a mechanic is not keen on noticing that the parts actually are either too big or too small in diameter, then they will overlook this fact and just install the parts thinking everything is ok. The right side was actually too loose, causing the caliper to move and knock by hand, because the caliper was actually too large even though it was the right part for my vehicle. The left side was too small, causing it to be extra tight and causing it to have extra force when braking, causing the snap/pop noise when in reverse. The clips that hold the calipers in place were also the wrong diameter. So, replacement calipers with new hardware fixed the problem. Brakes/calipers are nice and quiet now. I may have to rethink getting parts from here in the future, though, I have had mismatched parts even from Kia oem. So it appears parts are not made at all, anywhere, like they used to be. I was actually starting to hate the car, but, then realized, its really "not so keen" mechanics and poorly made parts....it's rarely the cars fault! :)
 

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The auto zone calipers should have been a rebuilt O.E.M. factor Kia caliper that simply get blasted (cleaned) and rebuilt. (new hardware and o-rings)
Them not fitting properly is either do to wear and/or poor re-manufacturing.
Some "core" parts are simply un-rebuildable and should be scrapped BUT they find their way back onto the shelves.
I would find more fault with the re-manufacturing company then with auto zone themselves f.w.i.w.
Bottom line though is that the work had to be done twice and the new (re-man/rebuilt) parts were faulty from day 1.
Not a huge concern with say a starter or an alternator but a much bigger concern with brake components!
 

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I had that "snap" sound on all 4 on my old Acura. I have since discovered it often means "wrong size" pads were used.
 

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Newest UPDATE: JdMartin....you were right! Are you ready? You may never guess what the problem was....so, the calipers were from AutoZone, not that it is a bad thing, however, if a mechanic is not keen on noticing that the parts actually are either too big or too small in diameter, then they will overlook this fact and just install the parts thinking everything is ok. The right side was actually too loose, causing the caliper to move and knock by hand, because the caliper was actually too large even though it was the right part for my vehicle. The left side was too small, causing it to be extra tight and causing it to have extra force when braking, causing the snap/pop noise when in reverse. The clips that hold the calipers in place were also the wrong diameter. So, replacement calipers with new hardware fixed the problem. Brakes/calipers are nice and quiet now. I may have to rethink getting parts from here in the future, though, I have had mismatched parts even from Kia oem. So it appears parts are not made at all, anywhere, like they used to be. I was actually starting to hate the car, but, then realized, its really "not so keen" mechanics and poorly made parts....it's rarely the cars fault! :)
That's crazy. I'm amazed the calipers even fit at all, since the center line (measurement between the two mounting holes) is probably different on every different kind of caliper. Nevertheless, the mechanic should have compared the new caliper to the one coming off the car and should have noticed they weren't right.

As for Autozone, I've had bad stuff from them straight out of the box several times. Worst of all was a new clutch master cylinder for my Jeep. Bought one from Autozone and kept losing my pedal and having to re-bleed. Finally pulled the MC and exchanged it for another one from AZ. Had the same problem (bench bled both before installing) and brought it to place with a power brake bleeder (clutch uses brake fluid). Still same problem, got poking around and finally noticed a small drop of fluid at the pushrod. Pulled it and returned to AZ, got a new one from Napa and never had another problem.

I usually use Advance Auto - I've had better luck with their stuff - but a lot of the reman stuff comes from overseas anyway so it's going to be suspect. Anything that takes forever to redo or is seriously messy I usually go with new, preferably OEM. Redoing the banjo bolt and bleeding everything again on a caliper is one of those things :)
 

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JD...few would be as intuitive as to "bench bleed" the master/slave/caliper before installing.
Good-On-Ya!
I often hear that "pop" after the car sits overnite and moves for the 1st time next day.
I was getting a God awful intermittent grinding noise which was near impossible for me/dealer to diagnose.
It wound up being an accumulation of rust on the perimeter of the front rotors where the vanes reside.
I had to pull the wheels and scrape the rotors clean with a scraper and some 60 grit emery cloth.
 

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JD...few would be as intuitive as to "bench bleed" the master/slave/caliper before installing.
Good-On-Ya!
I often hear that "pop" after the car sits overnite and moves for the 1st time next day.
I was getting a God awful intermittent grinding noise which was near impossible for me/dealer to diagnose.
It wound up being an accumulation of rust on the perimeter of the front rotors where the vanes reside.
I had to pull the wheels and scrape the rotors clean with a scraper and some 60 grit emery cloth.
After the first time you've changed a MC without bench bleeding, you won't do it again :D . Unless you just like spending your days cracking bleeders. And since I'm usually by myself in these endeavors - using a long bar to hold the pedal while I crack, seal, repeat - I'd rather not :)
 

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After the first time you've changed a MC without bench bleeding, you won't do it again :D . Unless you just like spending your days cracking bleeders. And since I'm usually by myself in these endeavors - using a long bar to hold the pedal while I crack, seal, repeat - I'd rather not :)
Do you Mityvac as well or back bleed?
 

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After the first time you've changed a MC without bench bleeding, you won't do it again <img src="http://www.kiasoulforums.com/images/smilies/biggrin.png" border="0" alt="" title="Big Grin" class="inlineimg" /> . Unless you just like spending your days cracking bleeders. And since I'm usually by myself in these endeavors - using a long bar to hold the pedal while I crack, seal, repeat - I'd rather not <img src="http://www.kiasoulforums.com/images/smilies/smile.png" border="0" alt="" title="Smile" class="inlineimg" />
Do you Mityvac as well or back bleed?
I had a Mityvac but I didn't care for it. I used to just use a stubby hose in a jar of fluid, but I wasn't convinced the hose was so air tight to prevent any air sucking back in, so my preferred bleed is a box wrench, a rag, a helper, a full MC, and a healthy dose of my old boot camp days: "down-up, down-up, down-up" while I crank the wrench. If. I don't have a helper, I do the same thing with the floor jack handle only I have to slide in and out to reset the bar each time. In any case, it's fast and foolproof but a little messy.
 

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I had a Mityvac but I didn't care for it. I used to just use a stubby hose in a jar of fluid, but I wasn't convinced the hose was so air tight to prevent any air sucking back in, so my preferred bleed is a box wrench, a rag, a helper, a full MC, and a healthy dose of my old boot camp days: "down-up, down-up, down-up" while I crank the wrench. If. I don't have a helper, I do the same thing with the floor jack handle only I have to slide in and out to reset the bar each time. In any case, it's fast and foolproof but a little messy.

I use a steering wheel crook-lock when working alone from steering wheel to brake pedal.
Being it is U shaped at either end it does not fall out of place when the pedal depresses.
 

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I use a steering wheel crook-lock when working alone from steering wheel to brake pedal.
Being it is U shaped at either end it does not fall out of place when the pedal depresses.
That's a pretty good idea. I guess I just got used to the floor jack handle method because I once had a Jeep that had a combo slave cylinder/throwout bearing setup, which was a lot of fun because then the slave cylinder was locked inside the bellhousing and you had to yank the tranny to replace it. Well, mine of course, like all cylinders eventually will, sprung a leak. Too busy to pull the transmission, I could get maybe a dozen shifts out of it before I had no clutch. So I'd use up my dozen shifts from the house to work, then at the end of the day I'd jam the jack handle, bleed it (only took 2/3 shots on the clutch mc), refill and head home, and repeat at home. Sounds like a hassle but I could bleed the clutch by myself in less than a minute, so the 2 minutes it took every day was still only 2 hours worth of time in 2 months when I finally got around to pulling the tranny and replacing. Which took longer than 2 hours. I think I carried the quart size brake fluid with me though I never needed more than an ounce or so.
 
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