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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so I have replaced the uptake sensor for my 2010 3 times, and also changed out the other one....now my car code is saying code is permanent! Any help out there would be appreciated...I need to smog this car and get on with our life together.....Has anyone had to deal with this? On the third 02 change the permanent code displayed...
 

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It sounds like you've been replacing O2 sensors that were properly doing their job rather than fixing the problem that was causing the code. Identify and fix that problem, clear the codes (except for the permanent one, which you won't be able to clear), and perform a universal drive cycle. If the problem is fixed, the "permanent" code should automatically be downgraded to "historical."
 

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Let me guess, your buying the cheapest sensors you can find?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
the only code that comes up is the 02, any suggestions of what other possibility may alert to that code would be appreciated.....
 

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Thank you , if you have any ideas to throw at me...much appreciated, as I would love to get to the bottom of the problem!
 

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Thanks for the clarification.
When doing sensor replacements always go with OEM.

Gotta agree ,fix the problem or the sensors will still go out.
Have a problem with your cats? Are bad or clogged up?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the clarification.
When doing sensor replacements always go with OEM.

Gotta agree ,fix the problem or the sensors will still go out.
Have a problem with your cats? Are bad or clogged up?
Not that I m aware of...I have a friend who is a mechanic helping me...(on student budget/limited funds) I can pass on suggestions
 

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Thank you , if you have any ideas to throw at me...much appreciated, as I would love to get to the bottom of the problem!
It depends on what the exact code was, whether there were any other systems out of or just barely within parameters, and whether there are any other observable problems. A mechanic who really understands OBD2 will use a scanner (not a reader) to get an idea of where to start looking before he or she goes pulling parts.

Without knowing more than what you've posted, we can't really narrow anything down. Some of the more common reasons for repeated O2 sensor failures include vacuum leaks, exhaust leaks, problems with the cat, or any condition that can cause excessively lean or rich fuel mixture (including problems with other sensors that aren't doing their jobs properly, such as the TPS). But there are others.

The point is that a DTC that points to a sensor doesn't necessarily, nor even usually, mean that that sensor itself has failed. It usually means that that sensor is properly picking up a condition that is outside the normal parameters of whatever it is that the sensor is monitoring. So before replacing the sensor, you need to determine whether the sensor has failed or whether it is properly reporting a problem.

If the "Corona" in your profile refers to Corona in Queens, New York, and if your DIY efforts bring you no joy, Giuseppe at Auto Tech in College Point is a master of all things OBD2.
 
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