Kia Soul Forums :: Kia Soul Owners banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,435 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have noticed the the T.P.S. dash light was coming on every so often.
I have traced it to 1 wheel on our 2012 soul. (10k miles to date)
After carefully checking the tire for punctures, (none found) I have deduced that the T.P.S. monitor is letting air get by it at very small increments.
I loose about 8 psi over a 2-3 week period.
Same tire every time.
I'm hearing the these monitors are known if not notorious for this even from other makers on other vehicles.
Anyone else experiencing such a problem?
Thanx in advance for any/all ASSistance!
 

·
Super Moderator
2010 Exclaim
Joined
·
8,085 Posts
The only time air is needed for my tires is when cold weather arrives, maybe once a year.! :)

Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
If it's always the 1 tire, just bring it in to the dealer. Should be covered under warranty, they can also check the rim and inside the tire.

It's not really the sensor- the sensor is working in that it's telling you that you have a leak somewhere. The sensor itself isn't a valve, it's just part of the valve as a convenient way to mount it inside a wheel. There are aftermarket sensor mounts that go on inside the wheel for those people who want blingy wheels with matching valve stems and not the TPMS stems...

in the end it's still just a valve, and valves occasionally fail. Could also be as simple as the seal between the valve stem and the rim. Is the outside nut on the valve stem seated all the way and tight? The torque is ~3-4 N.m. Also, the little spring valve is easily replaced, and on some sensors, the valve stem can be replaced without having to change the sensor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,510 Posts
Hopefully the dealer would have the ability (tools) to troubleshoot that problem.
If not any decent tire shop could do it.

They over-inflate the tire to like 60 psi and then put the tire down into a water tank to see if any air bubbles come up from the valve stem, tire to rim seal, etc.

You can basically do the same thing at home, but on a smaller scale.
Mix up some really thick soap suds and apply it to the valve stem with a small paint brush and look for bubbles.
Then go around the rim and check for leaks there too.

Good Luck!

TM :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
928 Posts
A small bit of dish soap and water in a spray bottle will accomplish the same thing. Overpressure the tire a bit, lay the tire down spray the sidewall and flood the bead a bit, then flip the tire over if you didn't find the leak and do the other side. Still no leak? Stand the tire up and spray the tread, roll the tire a bit and spray again till you see bubbles. Don't forget to remove the valve cap and spray into and around it to check for leaks. The little screw in valves are cheap little suckers that are prone to failure given the amount of pressure & heat they endure. Also, if you happen to have plastic valve caps, remove them, throw them in the trash, and replace them with quality metal caps. A good metal cap will hold in the air in the event of valve failure. The plastic junk ones will not. That is why plastic caps are illegal on commercial truck tires. Also,when you finally do find a leak, be sure to mark the location so you or the repair shop will be able to find it at repair time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,435 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
A small bit of dish soap and water in a spray bottle will accomplish the same thing. Overpressure the tire a bit, lay the tire down spray the sidewall and flood the bead a bit, then flip the tire over if you didn't find the leak and do the other side. Still no leak? Stand the tire up and spray the tread, roll the tire a bit and spray again till you see bubbles. Don't forget to remove the valve cap and spray into and around it to check for leaks. The little screw in valves are cheap little suckers that are prone to failure given the amount of pressure & heat they endure. Also, if you happen to have plastic valve caps, remove them, throw them in the trash, and replace them with quality metal caps. A good metal cap will hold in the air in the event of valve failure. The plastic junk ones will not. That is why plastic caps are illegal on commercial truck tires. Also,when you finally do find a leak, be sure to mark the location so you or the repair shop will be able to find it at repair time.
I think I'll just buy a new car!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top