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I read in a members post here that his soul performed noticeably better with a thinker (dino) oil over full synthetic.
He attributed this to the synthetic oil not being viscous enough to sufficiently activate his V.V.T.
While I am no expert on V.V.T. I find his findings somewhat questionable and in contrast to what little I know of V.V.T.
I am also no expert or even novice for that matter on the inner workings of his particular vehicle so this is a case of owner knows best.
I have always been under the impression that thicker/too thick an oil will foul the V.V.T. operation not vice-versa.
Would be interested in what our resident tech/techies have to share on this subject cause this enquiring mind really wants to know!
 

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2017 KIA Soul base, Titanium. Bought some better taars.
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I thought that sounded foolish but I don't know enough about the triggering mechanism. To further confuse the issue,

Manufacturers like to use a lot of acronyms on their cars. Variable valve lift (VVL) and variable valve timing (VVT) are two of the most popular ones. These systems sound pretty similar, but what do they actually do? Luckily, there's a real engineer here to explain it to us.
Variable valve lift is mainly used to enhance performance. Instead of having one cam profile for the entire rev range, a VVL engine has two: low-lift and high-lift. Under regular conditions, the engine will use the low-lift cam to operate the valves, but under higher load, a solenoid switches the engine over to the to the high-lift cam (or cams), increasing valve travel and therefore, performance.
Variable valve timing, on the other hand, is used mainly for emissions control. Essentially, it allows the engine to advance or retard the valve timing using oil pressure. This allows for more control over how much air-fuel mixture is in the cylinder (less under light-load driving, more when power is needed), controlling temperature and emissions.
But that's only a very basic explanation. Watch as Jason Fenske of Engineering Explainedwalks us through VVL and VVT in much more interesting detail.
https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-cu...how-variable-valve-timing-lift-work-benefits/


From 2006 but interesting:

REPAIRCAREVariable Valve Timing Codes? It Could Be the Oil!If all other components of a variable valve timing (V V T) system seem to be functioningproperly and the OBD codes will not go away, check to see if the oil has been changedrecently and if the proper grade of oil was used. Different grades of oil might look thesame, in the bottle, but do not act the same in the engine.Vehicle oil must meet two criteria: It should be the proper Society of AutomotiveEngineers (SAE) grade and viscosity and it should meet the American PetroleumInstitute (API) service classification for the vehicle. Both the SAE and API designationscan be found on the vehicle's oil fill cap or in the owner's manual.The viscosity and grade of motor oil is what interests us here. Viscosity refers to howeasily oil flows. Two primary factors affect oil's viscosity: temperature and age. Whenoil is hot, it flows quickly. Oil flows slower as it cools. As oil ages, the polymer additivesbreak down and the oil loses viscosity. The ability to flow smoothly in an engine isimportant because most of the passages are tiny.Most vehicles require multi-grade motor oil. This means the oil has characteristics ofboth cold weather oil and warm weather oil. As an example, consider a vehicle thatrequires a 5W30 grade of motor oil. This means that the oil has the flow properties ofa 5-weight oil when cold and a flow property of a 30-weight oil when warm. The "W"means that the oil has been tested for cold weather use.With more vehicle manufacturers employing variable valve timing systems on vehiclesto meet emissions and horsepower needs, how well oil flows through an enginebecomes very important. Many manufacturers use oil pressure or flow as the powersource to adjust the timing. If the wrong grade of oil is used or if the oil is old, theflow properties could be insufficient. If this happens, the timing system will not workproperly and the OBD system may set codes.
https://mde.maryland.gov/programs/Air/MobileSources/Documents/RepairCareVVT_June_2006.pdf
 

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Regarding the original post - to my understanding, viscosity applies the same to synthetic or dino oil. Therefore, it shouldn't matter here which you use as long as it's the proper viscosity for your temperature range, as specified in the Owners Manual. My manual does not prohibit using synthetic.

As pointed out in the quotes above, the wrong viscosity can cause problems. Likely in many areas of the engine.
 

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My manual doesn't prohibit it, but it also doesn't promote it. From everything I've gleaned over the last few years, and especially since joining this forum, synthetic is better than dino.

But, it makes me wonder why my owners manual doesn't flat out suggest or encourage using it. The dealer offers it, but has also never encouraged me to use it. Why is that?

With engine specs so tight and oil changes (frequency and correct weights) even more important these days, is it possible that the recent spat of engines seizing up are the result of owners not properly (aggressively) keeping up with oil changes/levels/correct oil?

I have friends and family who never look under the hood and only take their cars in when something goes wrong. Checking the oil is a distant afterthought.
 

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2017 KIA Soul base, Titanium. Bought some better taars.
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My manual doesn't prohibit it, but it also doesn't promote it. From everything I've gleaned over the last few years, and especially since joining this forum, synthetic is better than dino.

But, it makes me wonder why my owners manual doesn't flat out suggest or encourage using it. The dealer offers it, but has also never encouraged me to use it. Why is that?

With engine specs so tight and oil changes (frequency and correct weights) even more important these days, is it possible that the recent spat of engines seizing up are the result of owners not properly (aggressively) keeping up with oil changes/levels/correct oil?

I have friends and family who never look under the hood and only take their cars in when something goes wrong. Checking the oil is a distant afterthought.
Yupper. When's the last time you saw someone under the hood at the gas station checking their oil? I can't recall seeing anyone but me, I could have missed something in the last few years though.
 

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Yupper. When's the last time you saw someone under the hood at the gas station checking their oil? I can't recall seeing anyone but me, I could have missed something in the last few years though.
Heh...you are spot on. It's a rare sight.

With my EJ, it's really optimal to check the oil level no less than every other fill-up given the car's known history of oil consumption and how it's a dinosaur of an engine that provides minimal feedback on oil conditions, even though it's sensitive as can be to low oil levels. I've had at least 10 people come up to me while doing this and ask me what I was doing and if my car was broken. (Though admittedly, in the engines I've had before a turbo EJ, I was nowhere near this vigilant and sometimes a bit of a slacker in this department :p )
 

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My manual doesn't prohibit it, but it also doesn't promote it. From everything I've gleaned over the last few years, and especially since joining this forum, synthetic is better than dino.

But, it makes me wonder why my owners manual doesn't flat out suggest or encourage using it. The dealer offers it, but has also never encouraged me to use it. Why is that?

With engine specs so tight and oil changes (frequency and correct weights) even more important these days, is it possible that the recent spat of engines seizing up are the result of owners not properly (aggressively) keeping up with oil changes/levels/correct oil?

I have friends and family who never look under the hood and only take their cars in when something goes wrong. Checking the oil is a distant afterthought.
I apologize for derailing this thread - At least with the engines I've personally owned, based on UOAs I've read on BITOG (even though my knowledge on oil is very limited), subjective experiences from others, and my own personal experiences, I agree that a decent synthetic is usually of benefit. With GDI engines, I think the potential benefit is even greater, especially with seeing more purpose-made blends and full synthetics.

I've always attempted to best match the specific choice of synthetic based on engine-specific UOAs followed by sending my own samples to Blackstone - with most of the cars I've owned over the past decade, I've ultimately settled on the Pennzoil Platinum and (the now renamed and reformulated) Ultra based on those UOAs/widespread availability/reasonable cost/TBN numbers suggesting in most engines this formulation provides reasonably good drain intervals, although I'm currently buying Motul 8100 X-Clean EFE in bulk for another car - and changing around 3,500-4,000 given it's not the most robust additive package, but I'm more concerned with the HTHS value here than I am TBN due to the engine's tendency to beat the crap out of resource conserving oils.

I'm not having a massive amount of luck finding UOAs for the Soul's 2.0. Am I missing something or are they just not extremely common?
 

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Heh...you are spot on. It's a rare sight.

With my EJ, it's really optimal to check the oil level no less than every other fill-up given the car's known history of oil consumption and how it's a dinosaur of an engine that provides minimal feedback on oil conditions, even though it's sensitive as can be to low oil levels. I've had at least 10 people come up to me while doing this and ask me what I was doing and if my car was broken. (Though admittedly, in the engines I've had before a turbo EJ, I was nowhere near this vigilant and sometimes a bit of a slacker in this department :p )
LOL. "Hey mischter, wuttcha doin? :numbness:Is yer injun broke?" Oh too much.
 

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Heh...you are spot on. It's a rare sight.

With my EJ, it's really optimal to check the oil level no less than every other fill-up given the car's known history of oil consumption and how it's a dinosaur of an engine that provides minimal feedback on oil conditions, even though it's sensitive as can be to low oil levels. I've had at least 10 people come up to me while doing this and ask me what I was doing and if my car was broken. (Though admittedly, in the engines I've had before a turbo EJ, I was nowhere near this vigilant and sometimes a bit of a slacker in this department :p )
That's funny schwifty, I had the same thing happen. While I had the hood up checking the oil, a guy in a F250 pulls up, lowers the tinted passenger window and says "I noticed the hood is up on yur Kee-ur, y'all need a jump?"

It freaks people out when it's open in public :)
 

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That's funny schwifty, I had the same thing happen. While I had the hood up checking the oil, a guy in a F250 pulls up, lowers the tinted passenger window and says "I noticed the hood is up on yur Kee-ur, y'all need a jump?"

It freaks people out when it's open in public :)
LOL. Yumpin Yimminey!! Get awaaay from my caah!
 
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I check oil in my cars at every fillup - It's an old habit. Also since 3 of my cars are right at or over 20 years old - it makes sense. My VW TDI I check out of pure fear of something going wrong on the expensive TDI. I haven't noticed anyone else doing it but me. I don't mind that at all.
 
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