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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So...we pay all this attention to the tires we put on our cars.
How many of use are mindful of the air pressure gauge we use to check air pressure?
My accu-gauge that I have used religiously for over 10 years has developed a problem.
It is covered by a lifetime warranty so all I have to do is send it back for free repair or replacement.
I'm wondering what YOU guys use to keep the pressure in check?
(Accu-gage, Joes racing, Longacre, Quaaludes?)
 

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Wow... you are really into them to know brand names :) I've used some $15 digital one I got at WalMart for like 8 years now. Is that bad?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Wow... you are really into them to know brand names :) I've used some $15 digital one I got at WalMart for like 8 years now. Is that bad?
I paid 20 for mine over 10 years ago (lifetime warranty)
Only reason I (now) know "brand names" is because I'm seeking another one while this one is out for repair/replacement.
Many of the ones I have come across can't be used on motorcycles because the BIG brake rotors obscure the valve stem necessitating a 90 degree chuck and gauge separated by some length of hose.
 

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On my second Soul - a 2020 LX w/IVT
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As a fellow car-geek, I agree that there are big quality differences between tire gages. If I were in charge of fuel economy testing for a major tire manufacturer, I would certainly have accurate pressure measuring devices.

The reality is, though, that most people don't need highly accurate tire pressure readings. Almost any tire gage will provide the needed accuracy for the average family car. Sadly, most people barely check their tires anyways.

Since I'm a car-geek, I looked at the various options and bought a gage from Joe's Racing Products. The gage has a nice big face and has a good chuck:

http://www.amazon.com/Joes-Racing-32307-Pressure-Gauge/dp/B00404WDUC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1412536910&sr=8-1&keywords=joes+racing
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Seems my necessity for the 90 degree chuck limits my options to mostly the accu-gage which isn't necessarily a bad thing.
10, maybe even 15 years old and a lifetime warranty all for around 20.00.
I might just have to get another one of these bad boys for the after life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Though growing up with the pencil gauge, them seem wildly inaccurate compared to the dial gauges.
They are easier to store in the glove box though.
I'm thinking of installing 4 separate in-dash gauges, one to monitor each wheel. (Not!)
 

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Something I learned years ago working in the gauge calibration shop aboard the USS Missouri, is that smaller analog pressure gauges (1.5 and 2" dials) only have a 3% accuracy. Larger analog gauges have a 1-2% typical accuracy. The only gauges that do better are expensive precision gauges built for calibration tests and these must be checked and certified to retain any semblance of true accuracy. A precision gauge like this is 10 times the cost of a standard gauge. They are also typically at least 4 inch dials (many are 6 and 8 inch). If your analog tire gauge cost you less than $100, it is NOT precision. On an analog 60 PSI tire gauge, 3% is 1.8 psi. That means you are looking at a reading that could be almost 2 psi off. I do not fully trust any gauge unless you have compared it to at least one other reading. Especially analog gauges that get dropped and tossed about in a tool box or someones trunk. The old piston (popout scale) type gauges are much more durable than an analog dial (bourdon tube inner mechanism). No they aren't especially accurate, but an average of 2 or 3 readings on each schraeder will usually prove reasonably accurate. Digital gauges are better accuracy and less prone to damage, but are at the mercy of the battery (or solar output). I still think digital is the way to go. Always take multiple readings and use an alternate gauge to compare at various times to be reasonably sure of accuracy. I have a digital Accu-gage and another solar powered digital chinese gage and they are very close and consistent. I also carry the old school piston gauge in my glovebox and it is within 1 psi of the digitals. Again, I don't trust analog unless you have taken extreme care in handling them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Something I learned years ago working in the gauge calibration shop aboard the USS Missouri, is that smaller analog pressure gauges (1.5 and 2" dials) only have a 3% accuracy. Larger analog gauges have a 1-2% typical accuracy. The only gauges that do better are expensive precision gauges built for calibration tests and these must be checked and certified to retain any semblance of true accuracy. A precision gauge like this is 10 times the cost of a standard gauge. They are also typically at least 4 inch dials (many are 6 and 8 inch). If your analog tire gauge cost you less than $100, it is NOT precision. On an analog 60 PSI tire gauge, 3% is 1.8 psi. That means you are looking at a reading that could be almost 2 psi off. I do not fully trust any gauge unless you have compared it to at least one other reading. Especially analog gauges that get dropped and tossed about in a tool box or someones trunk. The old piston (popout scale) type gauges are much more durable than an analog dial (bourdon tube inner mechanism). No they aren't especially accurate, but an average of 2 or 3 readings on each schraeder will usually prove reasonably accurate. Digital gauges are better accuracy and less prone to damage, but are at the mercy of the battery (or solar output). I still think digital is the way to go. Always take multiple readings and use an alternate gauge to compare at various times to be reasonably sure of accuracy. I have a digital Accu-gage and another solar powered digital chinese gage and they are very close and consistent. I also carry the old school piston gauge in my glovebox and it is within 1 psi of the digitals. Again, I don't trust analog unless you have taken extreme care in handling them.

I keep my accu-gage under my pillow when not in use!
I think carrying an analog gauge "6-8"inches would keep you in the company of this man:
 

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$3 at Advance Auto Parts. Close enough for government work.
 

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Given the number of owners/drivers out there who have no clue what to do with any tire gauge and who just drive on, measuring and being off by 3% or even 10% would be an improvement. If $3 gets that job done, call it good.
 

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One gauge? Ya gotta be kidding!

I have several. And I've compared them, side by side and found that they all come within 1psi of each other.

I did get crazy once and bought a Digital Tire Pressure Gauge, for $9.95, but found it hard to use, so it sits in my shop, unloved and unused, while I carry the little $3 pocket gauge in the junk tray in my car. It's great for making sure that all four tires are at the same pressure.

I find it comical, that someone who is totally anal about tire pressure being accurate, still won't put enough air in their tires for great handling and improved MPG. lol

The pressure listed on the door post is for a soft and squishy ride, (for little Granny Whipple). Not for MEN, who want the best performance and MPG out of their car.

Just sayin'

:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Quote: "I find it comical, that someone who is totally anal about tire pressure being accurate, still won't put enough air in their tires for great handling and improved MPG. lol"


The P.S.I. debate soldiers on with varying opinions yielding varying results.
Gas mileage just plain sucks so a few pounds less, to soften that bone jarring ride, is a welcome trade off. (i.m.o.)
One guy here was running 28/30 p.s.i. so you surely must have bust a gut or $hit yourself from the hysteria!
F.Y.I...The (well established) place I purchased the tires from recommended 30-32 p.s.i.
But of course you know better than them and I'll be sure to follow your extensive wealth of tire vending experience over the folks who sold them to me!
These pencil gauges seem to get sticky over time and lose their accuracy where the dial gauges seem to endure.
PS...I would not consider myself anal about any aspect of this car.
I do what I can to maintain it myself and go to those who can do when I can't
I borrowed a friends "high tech" digital tire pressure gauge the other day.
It does everything but press your shirts and make the morning brew.
Turns out this "high tech" gauge was almost 7 p.s.i. off compared to my accugage.
So much for "high tech" & "state of the art" I guess.
I would have fared better using THIS to check my tire pressure though a bit big to be carrying around:
 

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used to own a 2016 Soul SX 2.0L - Caribbean Blue
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so glad we don't have TPMS on Canadian models - we have to do it the old fashion way :applause:
 

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Oft times the 'old fashioned' way is best.

One problem though.....with radial tires..... they can be 10# low (or more) and not even show it.

It only takes a few short minutes, with a pencil gauge, to check all four tires.

That's the only sure way to know what is what.

I always check my tires before any kind of road-trip, or once a week, which ever comes first.

:cool:
 
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