Kia Soul Forums :: Kia Soul Owners banner

21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,741 Posts
^^^^ Not to make a pun, but the definition of "warming up your car" is a matter of degrees. I can remember grandpa warming up the old DeSoto for 20 minutes or so on icy mornings. Of course that's not necessary for modern fuel injected engines.

The article, like many on this subject, imply letting your cold car warm up for a minute or two will "ruin" your engine. But then go on to say allow a few seconds for the windshield to defrost. I don't know about most folks, but my windshield doesn't defrost in 4 seconds. I doubt my car knows if its sitting in traffic to warm up, or in my driveway.

What the article doesn't address is the seemingly growing number of engines (not just by Kia) that are turning up with metal shavings in them, something logistically caused by lack of proper lubrication, which is often most likely to occur at cold startup.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
...
The article, like many on this subject, imply letting your cold car warm up for a minute or two will "ruin" your engine...
I didn't read that in the article. From the article: "The best thing to do is start the car, take a minute to knock the ice off your windows, and get going"

The article acknowledges your point about engine wear: "It takes 5 to 15 minutes for your engine to warm up while driving, so take it nice and easy for the first part of your drive."

It also quotes Volvo in saying it's best to give the engine a few seconds to build up oil pressure.

Basically I get in my car, turn it on then open the garage door then put on my seat belt, make any needed mirror adjustments then back out of the driveway and take it easy getting out of the three neighborhoods I drive thru to get to the first main road, which accomplishes what the article states.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
It is prudent to properly service a GDI motor:

1. Use Top Tier fuel whenever practical.

2. Use synthetic oil.

3. Use 5W30 or 10W30 in warmer climates to reduce oil consumption/contamination. I use Total Quartz 9000 Future, as it is the only synthetic at the local KIA dealer.

4. Change the oil more often than recommended by the owner's manual. Long service intervals may be a selling feature/perceived selling feature, but flushing suspended contaminants is cheap insurance. My first oil change was just under 3,000 miles and expect 5,000 intervals thereafter, factoring time, color and level.

5. Open it up on a regular basis. After FULLY warmed up, go to ~5,000 RPMs in second and third getting on a freeway.

6. Drive after starting. Avoid prolonged cold idle, unless needed to defrost windshield.

7. Change the PCV at ~50,000 miles
1 - No harm in running top tier fuel, but it won't help specifically with carbon buildup on intake valves in a GDI engine.

3 - I know I am switching to 5w-30 since my climate in GA is hot. I'm not really having any consumption issues with my 2.0 @ 57k miles, but I'm going to go ahead and make the switch.

4 - This one is the one I disagree with. I had the oil analyzed at 52,000 miles after 7,300 miles of use (on conventional oil, not synthetic). The results were great and the oil had life left. This time, I've made the switch to synthetic and will do another analysis again after 7,500 miles (engine will be around 60k). I suspect another good result. Short OCIs are overrated. And oil color is only indicative of it doing its job, not a good indicator for when it should be changed.

5 - Of course

6 - 30 seconds.

7 - changing mine at 60k as a preventative measure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
1 - No harm in running top tier fuel, but it won't help specifically with carbon buildup on intake valves in a GDI engine.
I am forunate that Costco (top tier) is close.
My eldest daughter in Georgia just bought a new Hyundai Santa Fe with GDI and it may not see top tier often, but a long daily commute may be helpful.

The bottom line is that top tier is recommended by Kia/Hyundai, so I will use it as much as practical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
447 Posts
4 - This one is the one I disagree with. I had the oil analyzed at 52,000 miles after 7,300 miles of use (on conventional oil, not synthetic). The results were great and the oil had life left. This time, I've made the switch to synthetic and will do another analysis again after 7,500 miles (engine will be around 60k). I suspect another good result. Short OCIs are overrated. And oil color is only indicative of it doing its job, not a good indicator for when it should be changed.
Good idea to have the oil analyzed.
Your elements were down the line normal...not better or worse than the norm.
Your properties were decent but flashpoint of 340 was 35 degees lower than threshold of 370, resulting from 1.8% fuel contamination. Although that is just under the 2 % threshold, it would likely have been better if changed sooner.

I view more frequent oil changes as cheap insurance.

I have owned over 50 vehicles, some for only a short time, but service them as if I were to keep them forever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
I agree with everything Sportster except No 6, I'm not completely sure of.

I was watching a video of a mechanic who tore down his Hyundai GDI engine that seized. He was convinced his habit of getting in a cold car, starting and taking off LED to early metal shavings and eventually freezing up. He said from now one he'll warm up a couple minutes before driving.

I've heard that oil isn't fully flowing when people turn the key and just hit that gas pedal. One mechanic said it takes about the time, as fast as you can sing " happy birthday to me " before you should accelerate, especially if the car has sat more than an hour.

I've worked with a lot of machinery that use oil and grease. When they are cold, the properties are far from adequate to push them compared to when they reach full viscosity. They don't even sound the same when first running them in the morning. On cold mornings, we always expect problems.

I know it's not in vogue to warm your car up a little these days, but thank you for the opportunity to express my experiences.

All the best.
Probably why I had my short block replaced and my head machined on my 1.6L GDi. Every morning I'd let it warm up for 10-20 secs, and as soon as I'm out of the driveway I have to pull out into a road that is 50 MPH (most cars goes 60). Sometimes I have a enough of a gap where I can accelerate modestly with the flow of traffic, but more often than not I have to gun it.

This is one (among others) reason I'm strongly considering an electric car for the instant torque and no need to warm up.
 
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Top