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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I always do my own oil changes. Drain until there is barely any dripping, remove old oil filter, put in a new one, pre-filled with some oil. Till in the exact total required amount, by the book. Use the gradations from the 5Gal oil jug - that is 4.23 Qt (4Liters).
Measure after that the oil level on that cold engine - it's usually a bit high, but the book says to do it on warm engine. Oh, well, I never double-check, since this is wife's car and I don't actually drive it.
Cold level:
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Today my "honey-do" list was to fill the Soul with gas.
Anyway, after I came back from the trip (long enough to warm up the engine to normal), I remembered the oil level, and after I let it sit for 5 minutes, went out again and took a look at the level.
Warm engine, after 5 minutes, level is still as high as cold. Picture is kind of crappy, the level is where I drew the red line.
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So... anyone else experienced this?
 

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Like Nobutter says, add about 1/4 less next time and work from there.

Unfortunately this shows just how much residual oil is left in the system when drained. A cold draining makes it worse & of course dipsticks arent exactly "perfectly" calibrated.
 
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I found that out too. The first oil change I did when I bought the car I put in what the 1.6 calls for, 3.8 us qt and it was too high. The last time I changed it I used 3.5 us qt and it was just about perfect.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
To me it looks 1/2 Qt or more, not just 1/4.
From 4.23 Qt by the book to probably 3.5-3.7 Qt.
 

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Just to be difficult....

I heat up the engine; drain the oil when the engine is still warm but no longer dangerously hot; pour clean oil through in order to remove more old oil until the draining oil is clear; re-install the oil drain plug with a new washer; add a bunch of oil, check dipstick and then keep adding until the F(ull) marker on the dipstick is reached being careful not to overfill.

The garage is lit but sometimes a flashlight is helpful to better see the dipstick and oil level.

To be anal, I no longer use paper towels to check the oil and instead use blue shop towel. Less inclined to lose lint.

I never bother filling the new oil filter with oil before installation. But it helps to smear a thin layer of fresh oil on the rubber gasket of the new oil filter. Hand tighten so it is possible to remove it by hand the next oil change.

Check oil level after driving for a bit and then check a week or two later. Check garage floor a couple of times over the following 2 weeks just in case you messed something up.

- end of difficult -
 

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Just to be difficult....

I heat up the engine; drain the oil when the engine is still warm but no longer dangerously hot; pour clean oil through in order to remove more old oil until the draining oil is clear; re-install the oil drain plug with a new washer; add a bunch of oil, check dipstick and then keep adding until the F(ull) marker on the dipstick is reached being careful not to overfill.

The garage is lit but sometimes a flashlight is helpful to better see the dipstick and oil level.

To be anal, I no longer use paper towels to check the oil and instead use blue shop towel. Less inclined to lose lint.

I never bother filling the new oil filter with oil before installation. But it helps to smear a thin layer of fresh oil on the rubber gasket of the new oil filter. Hand tighten so it is possible to remove it by hand the next oil change.

Check oil level after driving for a bit and then check a week or two later. Check garage floor a couple of times over the following 2 weeks just in case you messed something up.

- end of difficult -
:D man that's hardcore with new oil to wash out old oil. Beyond that and the blue shop towels - I'll use anything lying around, from an old tissue to a red shop rag - I'm on board. Except I usually use my strap wrench to give the filter a little extra turn since my hand/arm strength is not what it used to be.
 

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:D man that's hardcore with new oil to wash out old oil. Beyond that and the blue shop towels - I'll use anything lying around, from an old tissue to a red shop rag - I'm on board. Except I usually use my strap wrench to give the filter a little extra turn since my hand/arm strength is not what it used to be.
JD, we need to get you an oil filter socket. I haven't had to use my knuckle busting strap wrench in years.
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Love draining my own oil, such a good feeling when done! Sometimes I do it hot, other times cold but always prefill my oil filters and have a Fumoto valve in my oil pan, it makes the job so easy.
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
have a Fumoto valve in my oil pan
That's cool at first look, and I have considered similar, but...
1. Adds height to that bolt, bringing it lower to the ground. Might "catch" something.
2. If that easy valve opens by accident, like being caught in tall grass or plastic junk on roads, it will rain the oil while driving. Not the best situation to be in.
I know that the blue plastic thing in theory mitigates that. But that might fall too when you hit debris.

I don't mind the OE bolt once every 6 months. Anyway, more power to you!
 

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That's cool at first look, and I have considered similar, but...
1. Adds height to that bolt, bringing it lower to the ground. Might "catch" something.
2. If that easy valve opens by accident, like being caught in tall grass or plastic junk on roads, it will rain the oil while driving. Not the best situation to be in.
I know that the blue plastic thing in theory mitigates that. But that might fall too when you hit debris.

I don't mind the OE bolt once every 6 months. Anyway, more power to you!
All those questions have been asked and answer. Even a question that it wouldn't drain completely all the oil, compared to an OEM drain bolt. I've been using them since the early 80s' and never had an issue!
 

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Now I'm going to have to take a picture of mine when I get home. I think I've had it about 35 years :p
 

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Last week, I changed the oil on my 2019 Soul with 1.6 liter engine. I poured in four quarts which over-filled it about 1/2-inch above the dipstick full mark. I had to loosen the crankcase oil drain plug and let some oil out. About 1/2 quart was drained out to bring oil level down to the dipstick full mark.

An engine needs a certain amount of ullage space (volume) to accommodate pistons stroking down and not pressurizing the crankcase. Too little ullage is especially bad for a GDI engine because it forces an excessive amount of oil vapors out of the crankcase and into the induction system. I've got a hunch that overfilled crankcases results in a lot of oil vapor passing through the intake valve; causing burned carbon deposits on the intake valve stems.
 

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Last week, I changed the oil on my 2019 Soul with 1.6 liter engine. I poured in four quarts which over-filled it about 1/2-inch above the dipstick full mark. I had to loosen the crankcase oil drain plug and let some oil out. About 1/2 quart was drained out to bring oil level down to the dipstick full mark.

An engine needs a certain amount of ullage space (volume) to accommodate pistons stroking down and not pressurizing the crankcase. Too little ullage is especially bad for a GDI engine because it forces an excessive amount of oil vapors out of the crankcase and into the induction system. I've got a hunch that overfilled crankcases results in a lot of oil vapor passing through the intake valve; causing burned carbon deposits on the intake valve stems.
Overfilling the crankcase would cause the engine to work harder. Due to the crank hitting the pool of oil, causing the oil to foam up to the whipping motion. After it foams up you'll lose oil pressure!
 
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