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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Coolant below "L" on reservoir after car cools down.. should I add more coolant?

Hey everyone, just wondering if I need to add coolant to my 2013 base Soul (and if so, how much). It has 22,900 miles on it so far.

Got home from work, car sat parked outside for 7 hours, and the coolant below "L" by a centimeter or two.
I know that the coolant level will fluctuate based on temperature, and lately we've been having 100F+ weather here in Texas. The temp at the time of measurement was around 87F on level ground.

I haven't received any warning lights regarding temperature, and my temp gauge needle is still in the usual spot after driving awhile.

Should I add any coolant? Or should I check the coolant level in the reservoir after driving a bit to see if the level went up?
 

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When cold you should be about an inch above the low line.

Mark
 

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all the info is in your owners manual p 7/28 tell you what to do in checking the level, also page 6/7 tells you what to watch for

"the coolant level should be filled between F and L marks on the side of the coolant reservoir when the engine is cool." - or what Mark said.
 

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My car came out of the Kia dealers service at 12k with the fluid on the L level on its second service. Expect they will tell me needs fluid change on next service and want over paying. The car is keeping at that level.
People can remove wrong bits and fluid can be lost . Especially if radiator cap fitted.
Top up with the correct neat antifreeze to Marks recommended kevel and keep an eye out for any leakages usually white marks.

Jeff
 

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Antifreeze also smells sweet which can be another leak indicator.
 

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LIke Jeff said, definitely add coolant to be between F and L and then monitor it. Generally, coolant should not "disappear"; if it does, there is a deficiency somewhere.
Greg
 

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Stop over to AdvanceAuto Parts, and pick up a Gallon of PEAK Global LifeTime... Its already 50\50 pre-mixed with de-ionized water, so all you have to do is add it to the Antifreeze overflow tank...
NOTE: The over flow tank does not have a air tight sealed cap, so there is a water component to the antifreeze mix. So you can lose a small percentage to evaporation, thus lowering the antifreeze level over time...
NOTE: This is the BEST ANTIFREEZE...<:)) ~ Use this Gallon to TopUp all your cars as needed ~ Antifreeze does NOT get Old with age in the Gallon Jug sitting around for years, so its going to last you a LONG time for Toping Up...<:))

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
all the info is in your owners manual p 7/28 tell you what to do in checking the level, also page 6/7 tells you what to watch for

"the coolant level should be filled between F and L marks on the side of the coolant reservoir when the engine is cool." - or what Mark said.
I checked for leaks, did a sniff test, inspected all the hoses, everything seems normal. I've had the car for 2.5 years, I figure some of the water content in the coolant may have evaporated some?

The manual says "If the coolant level is low, add enough distilled (deionized) water to provide protection against freezing and corrosion. Bring the level to F, but do not overfill."

So.. should I disregard everyone post about adding 50/50 antifreeze, and just add deionized water? To be safe I might just add DI water and fill it up to an inch above L just to not throw off the water/coolant ratio from factory
 

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the best if you are doing your own mix (also it says you can use soft water), but many anti-freeze are pre-mixed so you just add that in straight. Where I am we usually use a 60/40 mix.

"the engine in your vehicle has aluminum engine parts and must be protected by an ethylene-glycol-based coolant to prevent corrosion and freezing"

"do not use a solution that contains more than 60% antifreeze or less than 35% antifreeze, which would reduce the effectiveness of the solution"

I also have an anti-freeze tester just in case :sneakiness:
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
the best if you are doing your own mix (also it says you can use soft water), but many anti-freeze are pre-mixed so you just add that in straight. Where I am we usually use a 60/40 mix.

"the engine in your vehicle has aluminum engine parts and must be protected by an ethylene-glycol-based coolant to prevent corrosion and freezing"

"do not use a solution that contains more than 60% antifreeze or less than 35% antifreeze, which would reduce the effectiveness of the solution"

I also have an anti-freeze tester just in case :sneakiness:
the best if you are doing your own mix (also it says you can use soft water), but many anti-freeze are pre-mixed so you just add that in straight. Where I am we usually use a 60/40 mix.

"the engine in your vehicle has aluminum engine parts and must be protected by an ethylene-glycol-based coolant to prevent corrosion and freezing"

"do not use a solution that contains more than 60% antifreeze or less than 35% antifreeze, which would reduce the effectiveness of the solution"

I also have an anti-freeze tester just in case :sneakiness:

So should I add a 50/50 mix (either premade or self-made) in with my existing coolant? Or can I just add water and bring it up to a safe level?

It doesn't get too cold here in Texas..
 

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if its not much then it shouldn't effect it any with just water - but that's why I have a tester just to be safe.

(you only have to use my quote once :sneakiness:)
 

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Grasshopper, just add the 50/50 mix the same as "Your Dealer" would do... Your only going to be adding a few ounces to bring it up to the "F" mark...!!! Its your job as a owner to be looking under that hood, and checking the oil level. and the antifreeze level once a month to make sure each is at the Full mark when both are COLD in the morning...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Grasshopper, just add the 50/50 mix the same as "Your Dealer" would do... Your only going to be adding a few ounces to bring it up to the "F" mark...!!! Its your job as a owner to be looking under that hood, and checking the oil level. and the antifreeze level once a month to make sure each is at the Full mark when both are COLD in the morning...
Technically, shouldn't the overflow/reservoir tank be at full when the engine is hot? The coolant would expand from the heat and end up in the overflow/reservoir, whereas during a cold morning the coolant is a little more viscous/dense and the reservoir will be lower?

I'm wondering if they filled the Soul's low from the factory, I remember when I first bought the car the coolant level in the overflow/reservoir was about halfway (between F and L). Saving a quart or two per car is a massive amount of savings..
 

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between F & L is your leeway, you don't have to fill it to F when the engine is cool - as long as it's between these marks and your temperature gauge is showing normal then your fine.

Just look at it at various driving conditions to see how the coolant reacts.
 

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So should I add a 50/50 mix (either premade or self-made) in with my existing coolant? Or can I just add water and bring it up to a safe level?

It doesn't get too cold here in Texas..
In Texas, use the 50/50. It's cheaper and will cool better. Ethylene glycol's specific heat capacity is only about two-thirds that of water. It's actually the water that does the cooling. The anti-freeze is in there to raise the boiling point, lower the freezing point, protect against corrosion, and (in most cases) plug minor leaks by way of a silicate additive. At 50/50 you should get a boiling point of about 220 F and a freezing point of about -35 F, which should be fine for Texas.

Where I live, I top off with 100 percent when needed (which is rare) and usually go with 60/40 or thereabouts when flushing / refilling. We rarely get temperatures lower than -20 F, but at 50/50, that's only leaving about 15 degrees F as a safety margin. At 60/40 I get -58 F at the loss of some cooling efficiency; but because the temps here rarely go over 90 F, it's a good trade.

The important thing to remember is that it's the water that does the cooling. Using too high an antifreeze ratio is not only wasteful, but it reduces cooling efficiency. For almost all of the U.S., 50/50 is fine.

The other thing to remember is that too high a concentration actually raises the freezing point, as well as reduces cooling efficiency. For the Northern contiguous states, 60/40 almost always provides a generous safety margin. For a very few spots in the Northern contiguous states and for Alaska, 65/35 will provide protection down to about -60 F. Any higher a percentage than that and the freeze point actually starts to rise again. At 100 percent concentration, anti-freeze freezes at roughly +10 F.
 

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In Texas, use the 50/50. It's cheaper and will cool better. Ethylene glycol's specific heat capacity is only about two-thirds that of water. It's actually the water that does the cooling. The anti-freeze is in there to raise the boiling point, lower the freezing point, protect against corrosion, and (in most cases) plug minor leaks by way of a silicate additive. At 50/50 you should get a boiling point of about 220 F and a freezing point of about -35 F, which should be fine for Texas.

Where I live, I top off with 100 percent when needed (which is rare) and usually go with 60/40 or thereabouts when flushing / refilling. We rarely get temperatures lower than -20 F, but at 50/50, that's only leaving about 15 degrees F as a safety margin. At 60/40 I get -58 F at the loss of some cooling efficiency; but because the temps here rarely go over 90 F, it's a good trade.

The important thing to remember is that it's the water that does the cooling. Using too high an antifreeze ratio is not only wasteful, but it reduces cooling efficiency. For almost all of the U.S., 50/50 is fine.

The other thing to remember is that too high a concentration actually raises the freezing point, as well as reduces cooling efficiency. For the Northern contiguous states, 60/40 almost always provides a generous safety margin. For a very few spots in the Northern contiguous states and for Alaska, 65/35 will provide protection down to about -60 F. Any higher a percentage than that and the freeze point actually starts to rise again. At 100 percent concentration, anti-freeze freezes at roughly +10 F.
Stop showing off LOL

Mark

I concur
 

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I'm revisiting this thread because having recently done the flush and fill, I noticed that when "empty," the system took slightly more than 3.5 quarts (including the reservoir), which is a bit higher than what would be called for for a 50 percent mix. The rest of the space was filled by water retained in the engine.

What this says to me is that filling with 50 / 50 after a flush would have resulted in about a 25 percent coolant concentration, which would be way too low.

If I were just doing a drain and fill without flushing, the pre-mixed would probably have been okay because what would be retained in the engine would (presumably) contain 50 / 50, so I wouldn't have been reducing the concentration. But after a flush, what was left in the system was just distilled water, so I had to use full-strength to bring it up to the concentration needed.

This is hardly rocket surgery, by the way. It's simple math. If you've done a flush and know that whatever liquid remains in the system is water, then divide the coolant capacity for your engine by two and make sure you get that much coolant into the system for a 50 / 50 mix (or more if your climate calls for it, up to the KIA-recommended maximum of 65 percent).

Also of note: The system coolant level may drop for a week or two because of air gradually purging itself from the system, so keep checking. The radiator may not necessarily pull coolant from the reservoir at first, either. Presumably this is because the line to the reservoir also has air in it and needs to be "primed." I know that I had to top off the coolant in the radiator twice, on two consecutive days, before it started siphoning from the reservoir. Then it settled down and started acting like it's supposed to.
 

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In Texas, use the 50/50. It's cheaper and will cool better. Ethylene glycol's specific heat capacity is only about two-thirds that of water. It's actually the water that does the cooling. The anti-freeze is in there to raise the boiling point, lower the freezing point, protect against corrosion, and (in most cases) plug minor leaks by way of a silicate additive. At 50/50 you should get a boiling point of about 220 F and a freezing point of about -35 F, which should be fine for Texas.

Where I live, I top off with 100 percent when needed (which is rare) and usually go with 60/40 or thereabouts when flushing / refilling. We rarely get temperatures lower than -20 F, but at 50/50, that's only leaving about 15 degrees F as a safety margin. At 60/40 I get -58 F at the loss of some cooling efficiency; but because the temps here rarely go over 90 F, it's a good trade.

The important thing to remember is that it's the water that does the cooling. Using too high an antifreeze ratio is not only wasteful, but it reduces cooling efficiency. For almost all of the U.S., 50/50 is fine.

The other thing to remember is that too high a concentration actually raises the freezing point, as well as reduces cooling efficiency. For the Northern contiguous states, 60/40 almost always provides a generous safety margin. For a very few spots in the Northern contiguous states and for Alaska, 65/35 will provide protection down to about -60 F. Any higher a percentage than that and the freeze point actually starts to rise again. At 100 percent concentration, anti-freeze freezes at roughly +10 F.

Amen brother!!
Saved me search time. KI will take your word on that 60/40 reducing cooling. Ya sound smart enough to trust for that info lol.
Hope you Aaaaaare.
 

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Amen brother!!
Saved me search time. KI will take your word on that 60/40 reducing cooling. Ya sound smart enough to trust for that info lol.
Hope you Aaaaaare.
Thanks. Just make sure that the finished concentration is 50/50 or thereabouts. It should be fine if you just do a drain-and-fill, but if you do a flush, you'll have to use about three quarts of 100 percent because of the water remaining in the engine. You can get a little more out by disconnecting the radiator hose, but you'll never get it all out.

Richard
 

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Thanks. Just make sure that the finished concentration is 50/50 or thereabouts. It should be fine if you just do a drain-and-fill, but if you do a flush, you'll have to use about three quarts of 100 percent because of the water remaining in the engine. You can get a little more out by disconnecting the radiator hose, but you'll never get it all out.

Richard
I truly would rather pay someone to do this but I cannot find someone to pay WHILE I SUPERVISE, with scrutiny
It's a catch 22. Like everything.
😂
 
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