Kia Soul Forums :: Kia Soul Owners banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was watching this video about changing the ATF on Soul:


He is talking about a 2015 Kia but I guess it should be similar for 2012 model as well.

I have bought Aisin ATF and like to know if this is compatible with the OEM fluid already in the tranny.
The car has 86K miles on it and I doubt previous owners has even changed the ATF.
I hope using Aisin which claims it is OEM compatible will not cause any issues.
 

·
Registered
2016 Kia Soul +
Joined
·
24 Posts
I was watching this video about changing the ATF on Soul:


He is talking about a 2015 Kia but I guess it should be similar for 2012 model as well.

I have bought Aisin ATF and like to know if this is compatible with the OEM fluid already in the tranny.
The car has 86K miles on it and I doubt previous owners has even changed the ATF.
I hope using Aisin which claims it is OEM compatible will not cause any issues.
First, your Soul is 1st gen and a 2015 is 2nd gen. The process may be similar but I would look for another video. As long as it meets MFG specs, you should be able to mix fluid. I use Valvoline full synthetic because it's SP-IV compatible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First, your Soul is 1st gen and a 2015 is 2nd gen. The process may be similar but I would look for another video. As long as it meets MFG specs, you should be able to mix fluid. I use Valvoline full synthetic because it's SP-IV compatible.
The Aisin brand claims their ATF fluid is compatible with the OEM. At the same time, I have some reservations to mix the non-OEM fluid with what is already in the transmission. Since I can not flush it there will remain some fluid which will mix with the new one. Now, whether their chemical compound and reactions will not cause any issue I am in darkness.

Once I used Valvoline MaxLife in my VW and it totally ruined the transmission. That's why I am asking if anyone has had any adverse experience using non-OEM ATF.

I will search for a video for 2012 model but I still think the procedure should be similar.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
That video leaves out quite a few things. Let's start with the fact that he doesn't check the level, that is a dangerous assumption that the level was correct and that putting in the same amount is a good idea, it would be like just adding the same amount of oil that you took out and assuming none had escaped or burned off and not checking the dipstick. Need to have car on level ground to check and get the transmission fluid between 120 and 140 degrees (need a scanner that can read trans temperature) See my picture, it's a Sorento but same procedure and looks same, you pop off the check plug (make sure the rubber grommet doesn't get lost, I have seen people come in leaking fluid everywhere because they didn't see that it fell out when they were checking it) you want to overfill a little and let it drain out till it is a small stream.
Second tip he doesn't show you is that if you try to pour it in the way he shows most of it will end up on the ground. You need to pour it in very slowly and I highly recommend you pop off one of the cooler hoses so that it can vent or the fluid will fill ever so slowly, like slower than a trickle. If you just pop off a cooler hose it goes down much better through the fill plug.
Another bad tip he gives is saying he doesn't like flushes and he gives the reason of all the stuff at bottom of pan. A flush has nothing to do with that. It is plugged into the cooler hoses and the car is running so the transmission pump circulates the fluid through the machine just the same as if you were driving down the road so no more will be picked up from the bottom then it would under any other condition so perhaps he just doesn't have a clue how the machine works. Drain and fill will replace about half of the fluid, a flush will replace all of it.
One good tip he gives is to use genuine OEM fluid. Most after market have additives or cleaners for whatever reason. Just stick with what you have and don't mix them or get it all flushed and use whatever fluid you like that meets spec.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
2016 Kia Soul +
Joined
·
24 Posts
The Aisin brand claims their ATF fluid is compatible with the OEM. At the same time, I have some reservations to mix the non-OEM fluid with what is already in the transmission. Since I can not flush it there will remain some fluid which will mix with the new one. Now, whether their chemical compound and reactions will not cause any issue I am in darkness.

Once I used Valvoline MaxLife in my VW and it totally ruined the transmission. That's why I am asking if anyone has had any adverse experience using non-OEM ATF.

I will search for a video for 2012 model but I still think the procedure should be similar.
I flushed the transmission on a 2007 Elantra and added Valvoline Max life full synthetic. I did it a few years ago and haven't noticed any problems so far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That video leaves out quite a few things. Let's start with the fact that he doesn't check the level, that is a dangerous assumption that the level was correct and that putting in the same amount is a good idea, it would be like just adding the same amount of oil that you took out and assuming none had escaped or burned off and not checking the dipstick. Need to have car on level ground to check and get the transmission fluid between 120 and 140 degrees (need a scanner that can read trans temperature) See my picture, it's a Sorento but same procedure and looks same, you pop off the check plug (make sure the rubber grommet doesn't get lost, I have seen people come in leaking fluid everywhere because they didn't see that it fell out when they were checking it) you want to overfill a little and let it drain out till it is a small stream.
Second tip he doesn't show you is that if you try to pour it in the way he shows most of it will end up on the ground. You need to pour it in very slowly and I highly recommend you pop off one of the cooler hoses so that it can vent or the fluid will fill ever so slowly, like slower than a trickle. If you just pop off a cooler hose it goes down much better through the fill plug.
Another bad tip he gives is saying he doesn't like flushes and he gives the reason of all the stuff at bottom of pan. A flush has nothing to do with that. It is plugged into the cooler hoses and the car is running so the transmission pump circulates the fluid through the machine just the same as if you were driving down the road so no more will be picked up from the bottom then it would under any other condition so perhaps he just doesn't have a clue how the machine works. Drain and fill will replace about half of the fluid, a flush will replace all of it.
One good tip he gives is to use genuine OEM fluid. Most after market have additives or cleaners for whatever reason. Just stick with what you have and don't mix them or get it all flushed and use whatever fluid you like that meets spec.
I don't think the ATF on my car has ever been changed by the previous owners. At least I don't have the maintenance records. So I assume that it is still the original fluid. Having sad that, the tranny is a closed system, so I don't see how some of it can burn or evaporate. Thus whatever it comes out should the same amount go in. Of course, checking the level is the idea.

Which cooler hose are you referring to? Do you have by any change a picture to share so I don't mistakenly won't take out a wrong one?

Although, I completely agree with using OEM fluid for the transmission, unfortunately I have cheaped out and bought Aisin because the OEM was expensive. So my hope is that it won't cause any major issues. But that is more of a wishful thinking. I don't have the tools to flush out the transmission. Given the age of the car I am trying to keep the maintenance cost at minimum and DIY. So I will go ahead with the Aisin and we'll see what happens. Many people report having used Valvoline so I may think it may be OK after all.

b.t.w. good point on the check plug. I had done it with my VW so I'm familiar with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
When you remove the air filter box you will see the 2 trans cooler lines right there at the front. Just use a pair of pliers and squeeze the clamp and pop either one off to vent the transmission when you're filling.
Transmission fluid does get low over time. When I do flushes I always check level before and after and most Kia are like half a quart low so not much but some are lower than that. Remember that there is a vent line, axle seals etc.. etc... minute amounts escape and over time it adds up and if any seal was bad on this car and replaced before you bought it you would be trusting they did it correctly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
When you remove the air filter box you will see the 2 trans cooler lines right there at the front. Just use a pair of pliers and squeeze the clamp and pop either one off to vent the transmission when you're filling.
Transmission fluid does get low over time. When I do flushes I always check level before and after and most Kia are like half a quart low so not much but some are lower than that. Remember that there is a vent line, axle seals etc.. etc... minute amounts escape and over time it adds up and if any seal was bad on this car and replaced before you bought it you would be trusting they did it correctly.
The car had not been maintained well. So I doubt if they ever had changed the ATF when they ignored most simple ones.
The cooler lines have ATF in them. Removing them may be messy and spill some but I consider it based on your tip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
When you remove the cooler line you might lose about a tablespoon or 2 of atf. If you don't remove it you will lose lots more trying to fill it. I work at a dealership and have flushed these transmissions 100s of times so just trying to give you tips on making it easier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
When you remove the cooler line you might lose about a tablespoon or 2 of atf. If you don't remove it you will lose lots more trying to fill it. I work at a dealership and have flushed these transmissions 100s of times so just trying to give you tips on making it easier.
Sounds good. Should be no big deal to remove a hose. But I'm surprised that changing ATF at this car is complicated.

I am also thinking to double drain/refill it to get the ATF inside the system as clean as possible. Double draining gets up to 90% of the whole thing clean. But it costs way more of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
Compared to Toyota, VW and Nissan it's super simple and doesn't require any special tools. Most other transmission are sealed today from all manufacturers and require a similar procedure so Kia is just like the others. Only one that might be simpler is the Chryslers that don't have a dipstick but you can buy a special dipstick with mm marks on it and if you read the temperature with a scanner they have charts at what mark it should be at what temperature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Compared to Toyota, VW and Nissan it's super simple and doesn't require any special tools. Most other transmission are sealed today from all manufacturers and require a similar procedure so Kia is just like the others. Only one that might be simpler is the Chryslers that don't have a dipstick but you can buy a special dipstick with mm marks on it and if you read the temperature with a scanner they have charts at what mark it should be at what temperature.
My Acura RDX has a drain under and a fill plug on top of engine. No hose or anything else removal needed. In 10 minutes you can change the ATF.

I have a good scanner but am not sure if it shows the trans temp though. Got to look into it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
.....I have a good scanner but am not sure if it shows the trans temp though. Got to look into it.
Torque Pro software reading a ScanTool 427201 OBDLink LX shows the transmission fluid temperature. Any similar ELM device should work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Torque Pro software reading a ScanTool 427201 OBDLink LX shows the transmission fluid temperature. Any similar ELM device should work.
Good to know but I already have a good scanning tool. ANCEL AD310 reads the tranny temp on its live data stream. So I'll be OK.
 

·
Registered
2016 + Designer Edition
Joined
·
10 Posts
... Any similar ELM device should work.
I use Torque Pro with a BAFX Bluetooth ELM327 adapter from Amazon. I get transmission temp thanks to the "Advanced EX for Kia" Torque plugin from the Play Store. It doesn't show up for me otherwise.

The plugin has problems on my TS10 Android headunit. Grr. I digress...

@westslope Does OBDLink LX give you transmission temp out of the gate? 😯
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
2012 has a drain plug and a dipstick, simple as changing oil! I've never used asian fluid but I used maxlife in my old soul (2011) and it never gave me any trouble in the 180k miles I owed it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
707 Posts
I use Torque Pro with a BAFX Bluetooth ELM327 adapter from Amazon. I get transmission temp thanks to the "Advanced EX for Kia" Torque plugin from the Play Store. It doesn't show up for me otherwise.

The plugin has problems on my TS10 Android headunit. Grr. I digress...

@westslope Does OBDLink LX give you transmission temp out of the gate? 😯
I am not sure. I bought a Kia Soul plug-in. There is transmission temperature output.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top