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Hi Everyone,
I just purchased my Soul+ 7 Days ago, and am loving every minute of it!
I was reading the owner's manual and after going through the whole thing, there's no mention on HOW MUCH fuel is left in the gas tank when the Low fuel level warning light comes on?

The Manual says, "This warning light indicates the fuel tank is nearly empty. When it comes on, you should add fuel as soon as possible."

Now i don't plan to travel hundreds of miles after the light were to come on, or even get close... but if it were, i'd like to have a good idea what my range is.
Does anyone have any ideas?
thanx!
 

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Mine came on a couple of days ago and I put 10.6 gallons in it. It came on before, but I have not ever put 11 or more gallons in. I have 1500 miles on mine and get around 300 miles to each tank with mixed freeway and city driving.
 

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I'm guilty of driving way past the "E" if I had to guess I think you have 1.5 gallons left in there. I drove 40 miles once the light came on, I was stuck in a mix of construction and determined to make it to my favorite gas station. I think you can go an easy 45 miles or more when its on empty.
 

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Since alnbang put "about 10 and a half gallons" in after the fuel light, and I think I looked up Souls's fueltank capacity to be 12.5 when I went to program ScanguageII (ScanguageII only lets you choose 12 or 13...not 12.5)

I would guess you have a good 1.5 to 2 gallons left when that light comes on. I had it come on ONCE, but I wasn't that far from some "rotgut" at an Arco. Didn't feel like "finding out" how much was left......and I put in almost 11 gallons approx.

So to me that means I could drive to my favorite station down in San Diego from Oceanside if I was feeling REAL lucky. Of course I'd never do that.

Don't EVER run a modern car out of fuel......I done that before in an old Dodge Shelby CSX (The Shadow derivative), and it didn't start when I got gas back in her. Ended up having something go wrong with the fuel pump. Mechanics said I had "cavitated" the fuel pump, and/or picked up a bunch of "crap" that was at the bottom of the tank....She had almost 150k miles on her, and I think nearly a thousand dollars to bail her out.
 

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My light came on last night on my way home from dinner and I drove about 10-15 miles.Haven't filled it up yet.So far averaging over 300 miles per tank!!!.Awesome compared to the 210max I got on my H3
 

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Don't EVER run a modern car out of fuel......I done that before in an old Dodge Shelby CSX (The Shadow derivative), and it didn't start when I got gas back in her. Ended up having something go wrong with the fuel pump. Mechanics said I had "cavitated" the fuel pump, and/or picked up a bunch of "crap" that was at the bottom of the tank....She had almost 150k miles on her, and I think nearly a thousand dollars to bail her out.
In addition to picking up the sludge, it also causes the fuel pump to overheat and burn out.. especially annoying and expensive when the fuel pump is inside the gas tank
 

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In the "Secrets of the Soul" forum thread, page 5, I posted the capacity of the low fuel light.

When the low fuel light comes on, you roughly have two gallons of gas left in the tank.

My low fuel light came on 8 miles from the gas station. I filled up putting in 10.9 gallons of gas in the tank. The tank is 12.7 gallons capacity. Simple math.

Factor in the average mpg is 26... you roughly have around 50 miles left when the low fuel light comes on.

There ya go

That being said, you should never run a car out of gas completely. Try to fill up at a quarter tank.
 

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I got about the same results.

The fuel tank holds about 48 liters (12.7 gallons) and when the fule light comes on it takes a little over 40 liters (10.6 gallons) to fill it up full.

I've done this a few times so I know how far I can get if I get caught.

My calculations are done averaging that there are about 7.6 Liters (2 gallons) left in the tank when the light comes on. Most Soul drivers are getting about 8.7 liter/100km (27 miles/gallon) or better.

I've calculated that I can safely get about 50 miles or 80 km once the low gas indicator come on.
 

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In addition to picking up the sludge, it also causes the fuel pump to overheat and burn out.. especially annoying and expensive when the fuel pump is inside the gas tank
very true....was told soon after i got my first car very many years ago to not get into the habit of letting gas go below a 1/4 of a tank b/c of build up of junk at bottom of tank and the damage it could cause and this was old cars...
 

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I'll probably get flamed for this but......

If you feel like living on the edge, fill up a 2 gallon gas container and let your soul run out of gas, making note of when the fuel light comes on and mileage. Then, you'll know exactly, under your current driving conditions, approximately how many miles you have left to go:). I wouldn't think that your fuel filter would get clogged with sediment so soon, eh? If so, your warranty will cover it.
 

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I just ran mine down dangerously low...don't intend to do it again, but here are the facts: drove 40 miles miles after the low fuel light illuminated & then put it 12.39 gallons. yikes!
 

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It puzzels me that so many of you are trying to ruin an engine by letting the tank get so low on fuel. As samuria Jack has said the pump gets overheated and will fail, and if it due to your fault, do you think that the warrenty covers this??????Just food for thought, the fuel will keep the pump cool and will in turn last longer. Also you don't have to worry about getting stranded somewhere.
 

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No Brat.....I'd NEVER let the tank under 1/4. I usually don't even let it under a half just so I never see "it's over twenty bucks". Don't bug me to say I'm not saving any money that way, I know. I'm just more likely to use cash than the Chevron card ;p

Please REREAD my comment up there, with emphasis on how much it cost to get my little Shelby back on the road.

And the one up there who said the pump and or filter is in the tank, thats old hat now. MOST cars have an integrated pump/filter/sender assembly right in the tank these days. There is sometimes (usually?) another filter somewhere along the line as well, but unless some sort of "trap door" was designed into the body to reach the top of the tank, fuel pump/filter work is a "drop the tank" affair.
 

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I purposely ran mine dry twice to find out exactly what "empty" meant. First time I was able to put 408.7 miles on the tank. Second time I had 389.4 miles on the tank. I do about 90% highway driving (70 MPH speed limit, but I set the cruise at 75-77). I carry a 1 gallon gas can with me at all times, so when I ran it out, I just had to hop out, dump the fuel in, and hop back in and go. I drove around for another 15-25 miles on that 1 gallon before going to the gas station and filling up. When I finally did fill it, it took 14.005 gallons. The second time filling up after running dry, it took 13.3 gallons.

One thing to make note of, when it did run dry, it was funny how the car acted. I lost acceleration power, but the engine was still running, almost as if it was a safety feature to ensure that I had enough power to provide the brakes and steering while coming to a stop. I have never had a car react that way, but thought it was a good idea (if in fact, thats what it was supposed to be doing).

Every car I have ever owned, I have driven to EMPTY at least once, simply so that I know what EMPTY means on the gauge, how the car acts upon reaching EMPTY, and my estimated range before I am actually EMPTY.

For those that say to never run a modern-car all the way to empty, I say pish-posh. AAMOF, I would rather run a new(er) car to empty, as there is actually less chance of there being crud/crap in the tank to get sucked up into the fuel system, and also because if it did, AND actually caused any damage, any neccessary repairs would be covered under warranty. It's a NEW car, there shouldn't BE anything in the tank yet to get sucked up into the system, and if there is, you're darn right I'd be making sure they fixed the issue completely.

Another thing I'd like to add is that I miss the days of my old Ford F-150, which had dual tanks. You run one dry, flip a switch, and VOILA!, a full tank "appears"! Why don't manufacturers employ some sort of "reserve" switch for vehicles like they do on every Motorcycle I've ever ridden? Have the low-fuel light come on when there are 2 gallons left, and then make the operator physically flip a switch to change over to a 1 gallon "reserve".

If you then proceed to run out of gas somewhere, well, you kinda brought it on yourself there, didn't ya' dummy!?!?

IMHO. YMMV.
 

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Another thing I'd like to add is that I miss the days of my old Ford F-150, which had dual tanks. You run one dry, flip a switch, and VOILA!, a full tank "appears"! Why don't manufacturers employ some sort of "reserve" switch for vehicles like they do on every Motorcycle I've ever ridden? Have the low-fuel light come on when there are 2 gallons left, and then make the operator physically flip a switch to change over to a 1 gallon "reserve".

If you then proceed to run out of gas somewhere, well, you kinda brought it on yourself there, didn't ya' dummy!?!?

IMHO. YMMV.
the same reason why they don't put a 20 gallon or 25 gallon tank in the car in the first place.

weight

more weight means less miles per gallon. that means less people buying it.

with your truck, people buy it for the hauling, not the mpg. that's why they can get away with it.
 

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In addition to picking up the sludge, it also causes the fuel pump to overheat and burn out.. especially annoying and expensive when the fuel pump is inside the gas tank
I've just got to chime in on this. I'm curious as to what type of "Sludge" you are referring to. It can't be water, water is already at the bottom of the tank because, well, water is denser that gasoline, and therefore sinks. other than that, any particulates would also presumably be at the bottom of the tanks. So really, the clean fuel is at the top, not the bottom. I'm wondering what on earth you would "dredge" up on the bottom of your tank when your fuel is low. I understand that running your fuel pump without fuel, and exposing it to air while running would burn things up, but that's a different story.
 

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In addition to picking up the sludge, it also causes the fuel pump to overheat and burn out.. especially annoying and expensive when the fuel pump is inside the gas tank

I don't think so.

The motor in an electric fuel pump will draw enough electrical current to pump a non-compressible fluid {gasoline}. The amount of that current draw and the work it is used to produce, will create a certain amount of heat. When the fuel pump is pumping gasoline, the fuel itself helps dissipate that heat and keeps the motor cool.

However, when that same motor is pumping only air - it spins freely - and draws far less electrical current - because it is doing far less work. In that case the air is sufficient to cool the motor.

Does anyone really believe that if the pump motor would get hot or even warm - in a container filled with only gasoline vapors - that any auto manufacture would put it there? The gasoline vapors are what present the greatest risk of flame/explosion. You can bet that electric fuel pump will run for hours without getting even warm in an empty tank.

I suppose that if you let that 12v electric fuel pump motor run for days in an empty tank - you could wear out the bearing/bushings... Letting it run in an empty tank for 5 or 15 minutes as you run out of gas and then fill the tank back up - - - you might shorten its life by a few minutes out of a 20 year service life.

FWIW,
Carl B.
 

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I don't think so.

The motor in an electric fuel pump will draw enough electrical current to pump a non-compressible fluid {gasoline}. The amount of that current draw and the work it is used to produce, will create a certain amount of heat. When the fuel pump is pumping gasoline, the fuel itself helps dissipate that heat and keeps the motor cool.

However, when that same motor is pumping only air - it spins freely - and draws far less electrical current - because it is doing far less work. In that case the air is sufficient to cool the motor.

Does anyone really believe that if the pump motor would get hot or even warm - in a container filled with only gasoline vapors - that any auto manufacture would put it there? The gasoline vapors are what present the greatest risk of flame/explosion. You can bet that electric fuel pump will run for hours without getting even warm in an empty tank.

I suppose that if you let that 12v electric fuel pump motor run for days in an empty tank - you could wear out the bearing/bushings... Letting it run in an empty tank for 5 or 15 minutes as you run out of gas and then fill the tank back up - - - you might shorten its life by a few minutes out of a 20 year service life.

FWIW,
Carl B.
You sir are the smartest person in this thread. I've ran every single car I've ever owned to empty b4 fill up, except during winter, and have never had a fuel pump or filter go out. The old "the gas keeps the pump cool" is a myth.
 
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