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I have read on the forums that it takes about 20 seconds for the Bluethooth to sync, but in my car it takes about five minutes. If I hit the call button before it it displays a message that says its downloading my phone book. One it does I get the message saying its linked up, but right after I make a call I have to wait another five minutes before it syncs up again.

I was sold the car without a owners manual, I have one in the mail, but in the mean time I can't figure out if the bluethooth is hooked up wrong. Is this normal?

Also, side note, I have the upgraded stereo package, and when I have the music on volume 20 the front right speaker on the dash has a rattle noise to it. Is this normal, or should I get it replaced?
 

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Also, side note, I have the upgraded stereo package, and when I have the music on volume 20 the front right speaker on the dash has a rattle noise to it. Is this normal, or should I get it replaced?
Never had an issue with that, even with the music up to 25. I'd say get it looked at if it's bothering you.
 

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Sounds like you just have a lot of friends. KGIS has a downloadable PDF of the owner's manual and quick start guide. Check it out if you don't want to wait for snailmail.
 

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I have read on the forums that it takes about 20 seconds for the Bluethooth to sync, but in my car it takes about five minutes. If I hit the call button before it it displays a message that says its downloading my phone book. One it does I get the message saying its linked up, but right after I make a call I have to wait another five minutes before it syncs up again.
I got my Soul today and am having the problem of "Downloading Phonebook" taking so long. When I am finally able to call, if I hang up and try another call, I get the downloading message again.

Were you able to pinpoint the problem?

Thanks
 

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One important factor that no one is mentioning is the model of the phone. Unfortunately, not all Bluetooth phones are created equally. While your handsfree system was created solely to be just that, your phone is created to be a picture taking, texting, emailing, music playing device that doubles as a phone. In the end, the Bluetooth technology has long taken a very low spot on the totem pole on our phones. This means it may not have the proper profiles, or not perform consistently.

To troubleshoot, I would find a completely different bluetooth phone (not the same manufacturer and model) and see if the issue repeats. Usually, it won't.
 

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Find out what version of Bluetooth you have on your phone

Here's a version history. Basically version 1.2 is faster than 1.1. And 2.0 is much faster than 1.2. Anyone know the version the car has? Would make this so much easier when finding a new phone.

Bluetooth 1.0 and 1.0B

Versions 1.0 and 1.0B had many problems, and manufacturers had difficulty making their products interoperable. Versions 1.0 and 1.0B also included mandatory Bluetooth hardware device address (BD_ADDR) transmission in the Connecting process (rendering anonymity impossible at the protocol level), which was a major setback for certain services planned for use in Bluetooth environments.


Bluetooth 1.1

Ratified as IEEE Standard 802.15.1-2002.
Many errors found in the 1.0B specifications were fixed.
Added support for non-encrypted channels.
Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI).

Bluetooth 1.2

This version is backward compatible with 1.1 and the major enhancements include the following:

Faster Connection and Discovery
Adaptive frequency-hopping spread spectrum (AFH), which improves resistance to radio frequency interference by avoiding the use of crowded frequencies in the hopping sequence.
Higher transmission speeds in practice, up to 721 kbit/s, than in 1.1.
Extended Synchronous Connections (eSCO), which improve voice quality of audio links by allowing retransmissions of corrupted packets, and may optionally increase audio latency to provide better support for concurrent data transfer.
Host Controller Interface (HCI) support for three-wire UART.
Ratified as IEEE Standard 802.15.1-2005.
Introduced Flow Control and Retransmission Modes for L2CAP.

Bluetooth 2.0

This version of the Bluetooth specification was released on November 10, 2004. It is backward compatible with the previous version 1.2. The main difference is the introduction of an Enhanced Data Rate (EDR) for faster data transfer. The nominal rate of EDR is about 3 megabits per second, although the practical data transfer rate is 2.1 megabits per second. The additional throughput is obtained by using a different radio technology for transmission of the data. Standard, or Basic Rate, transmission uses Gaussian Frequency Shift Keying (GFSK) modulation of the radio signal with a gross air data rate of 1 Mbit/s. EDR uses a combination of GFSK and Phase Shift Keying modulation (PSK) with two variants, π/4-DQPSK and 8DPSK. These have gross air data rates of 2, and 3 Mbit/s respectively.

According to the 2.0 specification, EDR provides the following benefits:

Three times the transmission speed — up to 10 times (2.1 Mbit/s) in some cases.
Reduced complexity of multiple simultaneous connections due to additional bandwidth.
Lower power consumption through a reduced duty cycle.
The Bluetooth Special Interest Group (SIG) published the specification as "Bluetooth 2.0 + EDR" which implies that EDR is an optional feature. Aside from EDR, there are other minor improvements to the 2.0 specification, and products may claim compliance to "Bluetooth 2.0" without supporting the higher data rate. At least one commercial device, the HTC TyTN Pocket PC phone, states "Bluetooth 2.0 without EDR" on its data sheet.


Bluetooth 2.1

Bluetooth Core Specification Version 2.1 is fully backward compatible with 1.2, and was adopted by the Bluetooth SIG on July 26, 2007. This specification includes the following features:

Extended inquiry response (EIR)
Provides more information during the inquiry procedure to allow better filtering of devices before connection. This information may include the name of the device, a list of services the device supports, the transmission power level used for inquiry responses, and manufacturer defined data.
Sniff subrating
Reduces the power consumption when devices are in the sniff low-power mode, especially on links with asymmetric data flows. Human interface devices (HID) are expected to benefit the most, with mouse and keyboard devices increasing their battery life by a factor of 3 to 10. It lets devices decide how long they will wait before sending keepalive messages to one another. Previous Bluetooth implementations featured keep alive message frequencies of up to several times per second. In contrast, the 2.1 specification allows pairs of devices to negotiate this value between them to as infrequently as once every 5 or 10 seconds.
Encryption pause/resume (EPR)
Enables an encryption key to be changed with less management required by the Bluetooth host. Changing an encryption key must be done for a role switch of an encrypted an ACL link, or every 23.3 hours (one Bluetooth day) encryption is enabled on an ACL link. Before this feature was introduced, when an encryption key is refreshed the Bluetooth host would be notified of a brief gap in encryption while the new key was generated; so the Bluetooth host was required to handle pausing data transfer (however data requiring encryption may already have been sent before the notification that encryption is disabled has been received). With EPR, the Bluetooth host is not notified of the gap, and the Bluetooth controller ensures that no unencrypted data is transferred while they key is refreshed.
Secure simple pairing (SSP)
Radically improves the pairing experience for Bluetooth devices, while increasing the use and strength of security. It is expected that this feature will significantly increase the use of Bluetooth.
Near field communication (NFC) cooperation
Automatic creation of secure Bluetooth connections when NFC radio interface is also available. This functionality is part of SSP where NFC is one way of exchanging pairing information. For example, a headset should be paired with a Bluetooth 2.1 phone including NFC just by bringing the two devices close to each other (a few centimeters). Another example is automatic uploading of photos from a mobile phone or camera to a digital picture frame just by bringing the phone or camera close to the frame.

Bluetooth 3.0

The 3.0 specification was adopted by the Bluetooth SIG on April 21st, 2009. Its main new feature is AMP (Alternate MAC/PHY), the addition of 802.11 as a high speed transport. Two technologies had been anticipated for AMP: 802.11 and UWB, but UWB is missing from the specification.

Alternate MAC/PHY
Enables the use of alternative MAC and PHYs for transporting Bluetooth profile data. The Bluetooth Radio is still used for device discovery, initial connection and profile configuration, however when lots of data needs to be sent, the high speed alternate MAC PHY (802.11, typically associated with Wi-Fi) will be used to transport the data. This means that the proven low power connection models of Bluetooth are used when the system is idle, and the low power per bit radios are used when lots of data needs to be sent.
Unicast connectionless data
Permits service data to be sent without establishing an explicit L2CAP channel. It is intended for use by applications that require low latency between user action and reconnection/transmission of data. This is only appropriate for small amounts of data.
Read encryption key size
Introduces a standard HCI command for a Bluetooth host to query the encryption key size on an encrypted ACL link. The encryption key size used on a link is required for the SIM Access Profile, so generally Bluetooth controllers provided this feature in a proprietary manner. Now the information is available over the standard HCI interface.
 
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