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Hello- I have a 2013 Kia Soul that makes a clicking noise when accelerating. I am thinking it is a fuel pump issue, but the clicking is heard in the front of the car. We ran a code reader on the car and the only read was a P0326- The Knock sensor was replaced, but this morning I heard the noise again when I was accelerating and turning on another road. Just trying to see what else I could be missing.

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If it's a faint ticking noise, it may be the GDI - high pressure fuel injectors make a ticking sound even at idle.
 

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No its not a faint ticking noise. Its like a loud clicking noise that can be heard from in the car. It reminds me of tapping shoes (thats the best I could think of). when that noise starts the car hesitates and if I let off the gas it will stop. I hope this makes sense.

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No its not a faint ticking noise. Its like a loud clicking noise that can be heard from in the car. It reminds me of tapping shoes (thats the best I could think of). when that noise starts the car hesitates and if I let off the gas it will stop. I hope this makes sense.

Thanks
If it stops when you let off the gas, and the car is still moving, it is almost definitely fuel injectors. When you take your foot off the gas the injectors shut off. If the car is moving and on, regardless of whether you are stepping on the gas or not the crankshaft is turning and all the rotary parts of the engine are spinning. The only thing that is shutting down when you let off the gas is the fuel system. Note that this test only makes sense if the car is moving; if it is sitting still the idle system still provides fuel to keep the engine turning. When the car is moving it doesn't need fuel until the engine is going to shut off, so your injectors will shut down until your speed reached a stalling point.

When you are diagnosing noise, you have to determine:
1. Is it motion-related? That means you hear it when the car is moving but not when it is sitting still.
2. Is it engine-speed related? That means you hear it more pronounced or speed up when you increase the engine speed (RPMs).
3. Is it accessory-related? That means you can start or stop the noise by turning things on or off (in this case, including the fuel system by taking your foot off the gas).
 

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One thing to add to your list of "things to check" : Years ago, I had a Ford van that developed a loud ticking sound. Drove me nuts trying to track it down. I finally took it to a mechanic I knew and trusted, and it took him about 10 minutes to figure out it was an intake manifold gasket leak. I never would have guessed that. But, if your clicking is louder under acceleration (under heavier vacuum), it's at least a remote possibility.

Good luck.
 

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Put the car up in the air if you can and have someone rev it up while you are near the oil pan, can be done on the ground. Just because I have seen it 100s of times I would say it is a rod bearing going out.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If it stops when you let off the gas, and the car is still moving, it is almost definitely fuel injectors. When you take your foot off the gas the injectors shut off. If the car is moving and on, regardless of whether you are stepping on the gas or not the crankshaft is turning and all the rotary parts of the engine are spinning. The only thing that is shutting down when you let off the gas is the fuel system. Note that this test only makes sense if the car is moving; if it is sitting still the idle system still provides fuel to keep the engine turning. When the car is moving it doesn't need fuel until the engine is going to shut off, so your injectors will shut down until your speed reached a stalling point.

When you are diagnosing noise, you have to determine:
1. Is it motion-related? That means you hear it when the car is moving but not when it is sitting still.
2. Is it engine-speed related? That means you hear it more pronounced or speed up when you increase the engine speed (RPMs).
3. Is it accessory-related? That means you can start or stop the noise by turning things on or off (in this case, including the fuel system by taking your foot off the gas).
Thanks for the help. I will look more into my issue...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
One thing to add to your list of "things to check" : Years ago, I had a Ford van that developed a loud ticking sound. Drove me nuts trying to track it down. I finally took it to a mechanic I knew and trusted, and it took him about 10 minutes to figure out it was an intake manifold gasket leak. I never would have guessed that. But, if your clicking is louder under acceleration (under heavier vacuum), it's at least a remote possibility.

Good luck.
Thanks. I am going to have Kia look at it and see what it is.
 

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The injectors do not shut off when you let off the gas.
Explain please. Why would the injectors continue firing fuel into an engine without demand? I looked through my service manual and it says when demand is zero the injectors settle at line voltage. I have coasted down the mountain and watched my fuel economy gauge peg. I can tell you for a fact that my Miata injectors shut off completely when coasting and rolling inertia is spinning the engine. I can step on the clutch and feel the injectors kick on and off when it needed the fuel for idling (engine disconnected from rolling drive). I don't know what the lower limits of RPMs is but I have rolled it to under 2k RPMs and shown it.

Are you saying the Soul continues to fire gasoline into the cylinders without demand from the accelerator?
 

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Explain please. Why would the injectors continue firing fuel into an engine without demand? I looked through my service manual and it says when demand is zero the injectors settle at line voltage. I have coasted down the mountain and watched my fuel economy gauge peg. I can tell you for a fact that my Miata injectors shut off completely when coasting and rolling inertia is spinning the engine. I can step on the clutch and feel the injectors kick on and off when it needed the fuel for idling (engine disconnected from rolling drive). I don't know what the lower limits of RPMs is but I have rolled it to under 2k RPMs and shown it.

Are you saying the Soul continues to fire gasoline into the cylinders without demand from the accelerator?
I think almost everything with injectors shuts off when not under load. Direct injection I mean. Also ticking could be an exhaust leak if no one had suggested that.
 

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Hello- I have a 2013 Kia Soul that makes a clicking noise when accelerating. I am thinking it is a fuel pump issue, but the clicking is heard in the front of the car. We ran a code reader on the car and the only read was a P0326- The Knock sensor was replaced, but this morning I heard the noise again when I was accelerating and turning on another road. Just trying to see what else I could be missing.

Thanks
I had the same issue I think. Everyone’s all like its fuel valves! then the engine drank all the oil and and blew my engine. Could your knock sensor come on bc ya know a knock? Dealer seemed to know but didn’t inform me I’d need a new engine. Watch oil level and talk to dealership directly about the issue.
 

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Explain please. Why would the injectors continue firing fuel into an engine without demand? I looked through my service manual and it says when demand is zero the injectors settle at line voltage. I have coasted down the mountain and watched my fuel economy gauge peg. I can tell you for a fact that my Miata injectors shut off completely when coasting and rolling inertia is spinning the engine. I can step on the clutch and feel the injectors kick on and off when it needed the fuel for idling (engine disconnected from rolling drive). I don't know what the lower limits of RPMs is but I have rolled it to under 2k RPMs and shown it.

Are you saying the Soul continues to fire gasoline into the cylinders without demand from the accelerator?
When I get to work on Friday I will post a screen shot of an oscilloscope pattern of the injectors when idling or coasting with no accelerator. I am pretty sure I saved one from a 2015 Soul 2.0 I was working on recently.
 

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Also if you use the factory Kia scanner you can actually monitor how many milliseconds the injectors are being fired when you let up on the gas as it gives us that data in live real time.
 

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When I get to work on Friday I will post a screen shot of an oscilloscope pattern of the injectors when idling or coasting with no accelerator. I am pretty sure I saved one from a 2015 Soul 2.0 I was working on recently.
That's interesting - is that stationary or moving? Automatic or manual?

I could see an automatic never shutting the injectors, but it doesn't make any sense to me why Kia would engineer a manual to continue to fire when there's enough momentum to turn the engine at desired RPM. And when I am coasting - in gear and down the mountain - I can feel a definite pulse if I step on the gas as the injectors come back to life. Maybe the length of injectors off depends on the force applied; in a manual you're getting direct coupling while an automatic is using a decoupled hydraulic setup (except in TC lockup situations).
 

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It may very well be different for manuals vs auto, the ECU pulls torque on the automatic even during shifts to make them smoother, not sure on the manual as I see maybe 5 a year. That graph is an actual reading on the injector while idling, never tried to hook up the oscilloscope to an injector while actually moving. I do have a data PID that shows me each individual injector that I can watch on the scanner and when coasting you will see the o2 sensors go super lean and the injection time go down but never off. I can't imagine that any car actually shuts them off during coasting. You can test your car, very carefully, by going down a hill in gear and just turn your ignition off and see if there is a difference when you actually shut the fuel off vs with the ignition on, it should just fire back up when you turn it back on while in gear. Obviously be careful doing this so you don't lock your steering wheel, lock the tires when the engine stops or restarts etc.. Only vehicles that I know that shut fuel off would be diesel trucks with Jake brakes (engine brake) they shut fuel off and activate the exhaust valve in such a way that the engine becomes an air pump that holds compression to slow the truck down without using service brakes hence why they pop so loud through the exhaust coming down a hill.
 

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It may very well be different for manuals vs auto, the ECU pulls torque on the automatic even during shifts to make them smoother, not sure on the manual as I see maybe 5 a year. That graph is an actual reading on the injector while idling, never tried to hook up the oscilloscope to an injector while actually moving. I do have a data PID that shows me each individual injector that I can watch on the scanner and when coasting you will see the o2 sensors go super lean and the injection time go down but never off. I can't imagine that any car actually shuts them off during coasting. You can test your car, very carefully, by going down a hill in gear and just turn your ignition off and see if there is a difference when you actually shut the fuel off vs with the ignition on, it should just fire back up when you turn it back on while in gear. Obviously be careful doing this so you don't lock your steering wheel, lock the tires when the engine stops or restarts etc.. Only vehicles that I know that shut fuel off would be diesel trucks with Jake brakes (engine brake) they shut fuel off and activate the exhaust valve in such a way that the engine becomes an air pump that holds compression to slow the truck down without using service brakes hence why they pop so loud through the exhaust coming down a hill.
:) Actually, I have done this plenty of times before in my Miata, because I roll down 11 miles of mountains in each direction every day. At the top of the mountain once I crest, I can kill the ignition and just coast (side note: coasting at 60 MPH with no car noise whatsoever in a convertible on a deserted highway with the top down in the summer is a glorious feeling). Usually if I coast I'll do it in neutral, but I've done it plenty of times in gear. When you turn the ignition back on for a second you will hear/feel the injectors kick on, then they immediately kick off when the ECU realizes they don't need to fire. Obviously I don't have an O-scope hooked up to the engine but I can tell they are off.

Oddly enough I've never tried it in the Soul. The only reason I can think of that I've never tried it is that it's not a convertible. But next time I go to work I'll try it and see what happens and report back.

In any case, I'm glad to have you around here. There's not too many gear-heads on these boards, unfortunately, and I've been in pretty thin company the 8 years I've been around here.
 

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That is interesting. I don't see enough stick shift Souls or stickshift Kias period to tell you how they do it. Mazda is known for some odd ways of achieving brilliant results, I had a Miata but that was nearly 20 years ago, today my convertible is a Porsche Boxster but my daily is a Mazda CX3 AWD as I live in a snow state. I will post up a screen shot of the injector firing time next time I drive one while monitoring data so you can see what happens in an automatic Soul.
 
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