Kia Soul Forums :: Kia Soul Owners banner
21 - 40 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
506 Posts
Oh great!! I just stopped obsessing about the software recall, and the aluminum engine head and throwing gaskets, and going into limp mode. Now I have to worry about dying. Hahaha! Can anyone recommend a 20K car that is perfect?
It’s similar to other cars in its class. And it’s a lot safer than cars of the past. If you want something perfect, buy a tank. 😂

 
  • Like
Reactions: Buzz

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Oh great!! I just stopped obsessing about the software recall, and the aluminum engine head and throwing gaskets, and going into limp mode. Now I have to worry about dying. Hahaha! Can anyone recommend a 20K car that is perfect?
Before anyone attacks me for this post... lighten up. I was joking about the dying thing. It just seems that these forums only talk about the negative. The photos of crashed Souls? Brutal. The list of cars with highest fatalities? That was probably just the short list. The discussions are enough to make one want to look for a used WW2 tank, only 2k miles, lovingly maintained and in perfect condition. (just can't take it on a road). No one is 100 percent safe, whether you live in a city and use public transportation, ride a bike, walk, or never leave your house. All you can do is try to make good choices and watch out for idiots. Get a good dog to help you with that. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts

"Fourteen models were found to be at least twice as likely as the average car to be involved in a fatal accident. They are: Mitsubishi Mirage (subcompact car) Chevrolet Corvette (sports car) Honda Fit (subcompact car) Kia Forte (compact car) Chevrolet Spark (subcompact car) Subaru BRZ (sports car) Nissan 370Z (sports car) Nissan Versa (subcompact car) Kia Rio (subcompact car) Dodge Challenger (sports car) Chevrolet Camaro (sports car) Kia Soul (compact car) Hyundai Veloster Turbo (sports car) Nissan Versa Note (subcompact car) Subcompact cars and sports cars are the most represented vehicle categories on the list,"
I started driving on my 15th birthday. I'm 84 years old now. I have over 1 million miles in an 18 wheeler plus who knows in a 4 wheeler. I have had a few "Incidents". If you are driving a car you are a vehicle controller. It requires your attention. There can be a huge penalty for failing at this job. In the year 2021, we have no accidents. Now we have crimes. (Use care out there)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
768 Posts
......
"With a top speed around 65 mph and an almost unmeasurable 0–60 time, the Samurai wasn't fit for American highways; but it was never designed for them."
That maximum speed in and of itself should be sufficient to reduce the frequency of deadly accidents.

Add a feature that prevents teenagers and folks 80 years of age and older from driving the vehicle, and it would be super safe.

In passing, setting the minimum driver age at 20 would prevent a lot of accidents and would be probably be good for the economy to the extent that such a measure would encourage many to stay in school. Good public schools teach kids science and how to problem solve, prerequisites for success in a post information-technology economy.

What I don't understand and what really irritates are the numbers of older drivers who should no longer be on the road. The political influence of this group is not a good reason to sacrifice other lives.

A friendly acquaintance killed a person and himself a couple of years ago on a well known tight turn on the TransCanada highway. A retired school teacher, Ray was chronically sick and in absolutely horrible physical shape; he should not have been driving.
 

·
Registered
2014 1.6l manual
Joined
·
376 Posts
...All you can do is try to make good choices and watch out for idiots....
One of the main reasons I bought my previous car was because it was the first year Honda made side airbags standard in the Accord. Fast forward several years and I'm T-boned by a red light runner driving a Toyota sedan.

Guessing I was a hundred yards or more back from the intersection when the light turned green for the car up ahead of me to go which had been waiting for the light to change. And guessing I was travelling about 35mph (was in a neighborhood).

That would mean the red light runner ran the red light approximately 6 seconds after it turned red for him.

A witness to the accident said the guy was going 60mph and didn't brake. I have my doubts. I suspect if the guy was doing 60mph I wouldn't be here.

At any rate the driver's side door held - only a few inches of intrusion into the cabin - and the side airbags deployed. I had to get out via the passenger door.

Took ambulence to emergency room where I spent 7 hours - of which a doctor and nurse separately talked to me for a grand total of maybe a ½ hour. Add maybe another 1 hour total for interactions with portable X-ray tech and CT scan techs. Had a sore back and at some point I discovered a sizable lump on my head while there.

The rest of the time was spent waiting around getting sorer and sorer from all the laying in bed (eventually started walking the hallway on my own without asking permission).

I like driving my Kia Soul but driving a small car carries with it an added risk, and an increasing added risk given the increasing popularity of SUVs and pickup trucks (particularly the large size SUVs and the full-size pickups).

For example according to a Motortrend article the 2022 Jeep Wagoneer and Grand Wagoneer will have curb weights ranging from 5,905lbs to 6,450lbs. I would not want to be any collision, but especially not with one of those (or similar) vehicles.
 

·
Registered
2018 Soul Base model.
Joined
·
52 Posts
This report does not clarify "more likely to be involved in a fatal accident". Are they talking about single-vehicle crashes or crashes with a second vehicle? Are these deaths the result of drivers running off the road and crashing into a fixed object or are they innocent victims of larger vehicles? Are these deaths the result of poorly-designed cars or just unskilled/inexperienced drivers? Too many variables.

1) Small, inexpensive cars are often driven by young, inexperienced drivers. Parents buy these for their teenagers and kids heading off to college.
2) Sport cars are often driven by people with more money than driving skill. Or, rich parents buy them for their kids' 16th birthday. Add lack of training.

On the other hand, we have always had small cars and have seen firsthand how drivers of larger vehicles (trucks!) will just push us off the road to cut in line. As Rodney Dangerfield would say, small cars get no respect on the road.

No matter how well a small car is designed and engineered for safety, it is going to be at a major disadvantage when confronted by a 6,000-pound SUV.

I wonder how the numbers add up in a country like Germany where driving is actually a skill that is taught and strictly enforced?
?The voice of reason right there...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
326 Posts

·
Registered
Inferno Red 2022 Kia Soul Turbo
Joined
·
11 Posts
The problem with many of these "reports" is that they either aren't very scientific, or that they're generated from sliced, diced and cubed data, after finding the exact angle to produce the correct shock factor, to drag in the views and ad hits. It seems like that may be the case here as well. In the report referenced in the first post:
iSeeCars.com analyzed fatality data from the U.S. Fatality Analysis Reporting System for cars from the model years 2013-2017, as well as iSeeCars.com’s own data on more than 25 million used cars from the same model years.
You can see they're only looking at 4 years worth of cars. And among those four years worth of car models, all others ignored, perhaps what they say is true. But they fail to tell you that the fatalities might be in the range of 10-20 per billion miles driven for the cars in question... or that there are dozens of other, more deadly vehicles on the road you're driving. The intent seems to be to scare people... to shock them, to make them share it on forums and other social platforms... OMG BERTHA YOU DRIVE ONE OF THOSE!!! --but the actual deadliest cars on the road today don't even come from the era in question. (But let's not tell them that... that would be no fun and bring less ad dollars)
Rectangle Slope Plot Font Parallel



Like I say though, it's all in where you get your data, and which view you want to use. Check out this report, and you'll find neither a Hyundai nor a Kia in the top 25. From this angle it looks like the Ford F-series still reigns as the supreme people-killer. This was from data spanning a five year period but using NHTSA data on wrecked/fatality vehicles of all years during the timeframe being considered.
Top 20 Deadliest Vehicles in the United States — and Those That Kill Occupants the Most

Font Rectangle Screenshot Parallel Pattern



So yeah, I'm not too worried. Good stuff though. Makes me think and dig around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
The problem with many of these "reports" is that they either aren't very scientific, or that they're generated from sliced, diced and cubed data, after finding the exact angle to produce the correct shock factor, to drag in the views and ad hits. It seems like that may be the case here as well. In the report referenced in the first post:

You can see they're only looking at 4 years worth of cars. And among those four years worth of car models, all others ignored, perhaps what they say is true. But they fail to tell you that the fatalities might be in the range of 10-20 per billion miles driven for the cars in question... or that there are dozens of other, more deadly vehicles on the road you're driving. The intent seems to be to scare people... to shock them, to make them share it on forums and other social platforms... OMG BERTHA YOU DRIVE ONE OF THOSE!!! --but the actual deadliest cars on the road today don't even come from the era in question. (But let's not tell them that... that would be no fun and bring less ad dollars)
View attachment 138383


Like I say though, it's all in where you get your data, and which view you want to use. Check out this report, and you'll find neither a Hyundai nor a Kia in the top 25. From this angle it looks like the Ford F-series still reigns as the supreme people-killer. This was from data spanning a five year period but using NHTSA data on wrecked/fatality vehicles of all years during the timeframe being considered.
Top 20 Deadliest Vehicles in the United States — and Those That Kill Occupants the Most

View attachment 138384


So yeah, I'm not too worried. Good stuff though. Makes me think and dig around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,657 Posts
See! It's all "lies, damn lies and statistics" as they say. I hear that 71.9% of ALL statistics are made up on the fly anyhow :)
Nope, it's 99.5%. :ROFLMAO:

I have always preferred small cars, or better yet, motorcycles.
Sure, everyone has a story about someone who was killed or maimed while riding a bike.
I knew a couple guys that never made it home from their last ride. Both self induced.
Really, imho, it comes down to the pilot.
Stuff happens, but don't drive or ride like a jackazz, and you will probably be OK.
Also get a dashcam for when the other jackazz runs into you, and tries to lie about it. :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Inferno Red 2022 Kia Soul Turbo
Joined
·
11 Posts
Nope, it's 99.5%. :ROFLMAO:
YEP!

I have always preferred small cars, or better yet, motorcycles.
Sure, everyone has a story about someone who was killed or maimed while riding a bike.
I knew a couple guys that never made it home from their last ride. Both self induced.
Really, imho, it comes down to the pilot.
Stuff happens, but don't drive or ride like a jackazz, and you will probably be OK.
Also get a dashcam for when the other jackazz runs into you, and tries to lie about it. :rolleyes:
I hear ya. I kept a bike for the longest time, myself. I still miss riding sometimes.
100% on the dashcam. It's amazing what folks try to get away with, and often DO, if there isn't any video.
 
21 - 40 of 42 Posts
Top